The First Battle of the American Civil War: The Battle of First Manassas

American History, Military and Government, Slavery in America and the World
Stephanie Ruesch

Both sides agreed the war would be over by Christmas. South Carolina had seceded from the Union the previous year, on December 20, 1860, and by February six more states had also left the Union. Newly independent South Carolina demanded the U.S. Army pull out of Charleston Harbor, but instead of leaving Carolinian waters, the army relocated to Fort Sumter. A tense siege followed, ending with gunfire on April 12, 1861. Read more about the fighting at Fort Sumter in this blog post. When the artillery stopped firing the next day, the U.S. Army abandoned the fort, four more Southern states seceded to join the Confederate States of America…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The American Flag

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series with a consideration of the origins and evolution of the American flag.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.


LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SERIAL SET

These posts have been so informative; they enable both patrons and staff to understand what the Serial Set is and how invaluable it is to all kinds of research…

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100 Years after the Tulsa Race Massacre

American History, Bar Journals Library, Civil Rights and Social Justice, Law Journal Library, Session Laws
Stephanie Ruesch

On May 19, 2021, three survivors of the Tulsa Race Massacre testified before a House Judiciary Subcommittee, recounting for the congressional record their memories of May 31 and June 1, 1921, when a white mob descended on the predominately Black neighborhood of Greenwood Avenue in Tulsa, OK, killing hundreds of Black people and leveling homes and businesses. The three survivors were all young children when the massacre occurred and are now all over one hundred years old. Through their testimony they urged Congress to act and give them and other survivors justice while they were still alive. Watch their testimony here.

The Tulsa Race Massacre…

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The Complicated History of Eugenics in the United States

American History, Human Rights, Immigration, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Session Laws
Tara Kibler

Most would agree that the future of the human race depends on the capability of its offspring. At the turn of the 20th century, with the rise of the eugenics movement, this premise was taken to a logical yet dismal conclusion: the human race could be improved if only the genetically superior were allowed to reproduce.

Though such talk may be repulsive to many in the modern era, it was surprisingly commonplace just a few generations ago. Even more shocking, you’ll find notable, well-respected names on the list of advocates for the practice. It was only when eugenics was taken to its extreme under Nazi Germany that the movement began to fall out of favor…

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8 Forgotten Stories from American History

American History, State Constitutions Illustrated, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

It’s easy to recall some of U.S. history’s most notable events, such as World War I, the fight for civil rights, or the moon landing. If you’re a history buff, you probably are well aware of moments like the Chernobyl disaster, FDR’s New Deal, or the Treaty of Paris that ended the American Revolution.

American history is brimming with lesser-known—but still fascinating—phenomena that even the most diligent historian may have forgotten. Keep reading to explore a few of these stories with HeinOnline.

1. Franklin: The Almost 14th State

At the close of the American Revolution…

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10 Historical Events You Didn’t Know Happened in March

American History, Foreign Affairs
Tara Kibler

Ah, March—for many, synonymous with “spring,” although not quite here for us at Hein headquarters in Buffalo, N.Y.

There’s actually quite a few notable events that have taken place during this month over the centuries. On this last day of March, let’s look at 10 of them.


1. Ratification of the Articles of Confederation

The Articles of Confederation were passed on November 15, 1777 after more than a year of debate. Still, they would not be ratified for almost four more years due to land disputes between various states—particularly Maryland and Virginia. By March 1, 1789, the document was finally proclaimed the law of the land after the one holdout…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: Education in America

American History, Education, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series with a look at the evolution of education throughout American History.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.

These posts have been so informative; they enable both patrons and staff to understand what the Serial Set is and how invaluable it is to all kinds of research…

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Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, Women's Studies
Stephanie Ruesch

The Medal of Honor is America’s highest military honor, awarded by the President in the name of Congress for extraordinary acts of valor. First presented in 1863 to the surviving Andrews Raiders, Union soldiers who volunteered to commandeer the Confederate train The General, the Medal of Honor has since been awarded more than 3,500 times. The criteria and design of the Medal has changed since 1863, and today three variants of the Medal exist: one for the Department of the Army (awarded to soldiers), one for the Department of the Navy (awarded to sailors, marines, and coast guardsmen)…

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12 Female Firsts from American History for Women’s History Month

American History, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Tara Kibler

Women’s History Month has been observed since the 1980s as a way to highlight the contributions of women to society over the years. Let’s do just that with HeinOnline’s Women and the Law database by taking a look at some of the most notable “female firsts” in U.S. history.


WOMEN AND THE LAW

HeinOnline is pleased to offer Women and the Law (Peggy), a database that brings together thousands of books, biographies, and periodicals that allow users to research the progression of women’s rights over the past 200 years. Discover primary legal and political sources as well as secondary scholarly analysis of issues such as abortion…

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Beatings, Battles, and Brawls: Congressional Violence in the Antebellum Era

American History, Political Science, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

When any slightly incendiary word is uttered in Congress, the media is quick to report it. Today, live coverage of congressional proceedings and social media-driven insta-news has made us all well aware of any tiffs, squabbles, or fallings-out in Washington. As a result, we’re also well aware that strong disagreement in the Capitol is, as to be expected, very common.

There was a time in American history, though, when disagreements became so heated that they turned physical, ranging from a singular blow to a vicious beating, and even to murder. In the pre-Civil War era, Congress saw at least 70 violent incidents between its members. Let’s just say that if C-SPAN had existed in the early 1800s…

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