U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch

Author Profile Pages, Case Law, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Hein Blog, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

neilgorsuchsupremecourtnominee

On January 31, 2017 Judge Neil Gorsuch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit was officially nominated by President Donald J. Trump to fill the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy.  The vacancy was created by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia last year on February 13, 2016.

Born in Denver, Colorado, he moved to Washington, D.C. when his mother, Anne Gorsuch Burford, was appointed as the first female head of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. He went on to graduate from Columbia University with honors and earn his Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School, where he received a Truman Scholarship. As a Marshall Scholar…

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Black History Month and Race Relations in the United States

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, U.S. Congressional Documents
admin

bhm

Each February, Americans honor both people and significant events in African-American history during Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month.

Among the myriad reasons Black History Month is important is the underrepresentation of people of color in standard history classes. For instance, the recently released biographical drama Hidden Figures depicts the story of three female African-American mathematicians who worked at NASA and were integral in getting American astronauts into space. Their names are nowhere near as widely discussed as John Glenn or Neil Armstrong, though their contributions to the space program were arguably as important.

Because underrepresentation of African Americans in traditionally-taught history has long been a problem, Black History Week was created in 1926…

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Researching Executive Power in HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Federal Register, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

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Since President Donald Trump took office on January 20, he has issued several executive orders. To understand the importance and potential consequences of these actions, let's review legal scholarship on the topic in HeinOnline.

NOTE: HeinOnline's content is composed of image-based PDFs, which are exact replicas of original print documents, so authenticity is never a question. Also, we promise that none of the content will spontaneously vanish from the site.

A search for title: "executive order" OR title: "executive power" OR title: "presidential power" produces nearly 600 results in the Law Journal Library. Sort results by Number of Times Cited by Articles to view the most cited material first:

execi

The most-cited article from among these results is by Michael Stokes Paulsen

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Tilikum, Circus Elephants, and Animal Rights

Animal Law, Current Events, Hein Blog, National Survey of State Laws, Navigating, Searching, Subject Compilations of State Laws, Tips and Tricks
Bonnie Hein

tilikumandcircusblog

Tilikum was a 22 feet long, more than 11,000 pound killer whale and possibly the most famous orca in the world. Earlier this month, he died of serious health issues at an estimated 36 years of age. He was captured near his birthplace of Iceland and performed in captivity for decades, becoming notorious for aggressive behavior, including the death of three people. Tilikum was profiled in the documentary Blackfish, which helped to influence popular opinion on killer whales in captivity and on SeaWorld in particular. 

Similarly, the "Greatest Show on Earth," another long-time attraction, has received increasingly negative public sentiment regarding captive wild animals forced to perform as entertainment…

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Research the Effects of Opioids on Society

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Hein Blog, Searching, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

opioid-epidemic

A recent newspaper investigation revealed that drug wholesalers have shipped 780 million prescription painkillers to West Virginia over a six-year period. This amounted to more than 400 pills per person in West Virginia.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), six counties of West Virginia ranked in the top 10 in the nation for fatal pain pill overdoses. Between 2007 and 2012, more than 1,700 West Virginians died of hydrocodone or oxycodone overdoses, affecting generations of families and representing only a fragment of a growing national crisis.

More than 33,000 people in the United States were killed from opioid overdoses in 2015…

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

Yesterday, the United States observed the holiday which marks Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.

Did you know?

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia with the original birth name of Michael King. His father was also named Michael King and later changed both his own and his son's name after a trip to Germany. The name Martin Luther was chosen in honor of the German religious reformer from the 1500s.

About Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.  He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights through nonviolent disobedience and for protesting racial discrimination in federal and state laws…

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Fact-Check to Avoid Spreading Fake News

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

Fake News: Then and Now

In 1938, Orson Welles directed and narrated an episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air that allegedly resulted in mass panic, as many listeners mistakenly thought the episode was a legitimate news broadcast. Titled "The War of the Worlds," the broadcast was composed of a series of simulated news bulletins about an alien invasion. It is hypothesized that people who tuned into the broadcast after its introduction, in which it was stated that program was a fictitious drama, believed the broadcast to be actual news, leading to phone calls to the radio station and panic. The degree to which the panic was widespread may have been overstated and is now a topic of debate among historians. 

Nearly 80 years later…

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Dakota Access Pipeline Project: Good or Bad?

American Indian, Case Law, Citations, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Hein Blog, U.S. Supreme Court, World Treaty Library
Bonnie Hein

On Monday, the Department of the Army announced their denial of the final easement of the Dakota Access Pipeline project under Lake Oahe, stating: "The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing."  To the protestors recently numbering more than 2,000, this decision is a great victory at the Standing Rock site; however, their fight may be far from over.

The announcement comes after months of litigation, protests, and at times violence, over the completion of the DAPL project.  On the recent Sunday evening of November 20th, 400 protesters collided with police, leading to the hospitalization of many protesters…

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Happy Birthday, Mark Twain!

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline
Shannon Sabo

November is Mark Twain's birthday month. Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November 30, 1835, he was a writer, publisher, and public speaker, and is known as the "father of American literature." Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which ultimately became the setting for two of his most notable books, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Adventures of Tom Sawyer. His wit and satire, both written and spoken, were widely praised by critics, peers, and an international audience. He counted artists, industrialists, presidents, and royalty among his friends.

Fun Facts about Mark Twain
  • He was born two weeks after a visit from Halley's Comet. He famously predicted that he would "go out with it…

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Check out the U.S. Presidential Library in HeinOnline!

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

Today is Election Day! It has been an unconventional and seemingly prolonged path to the White House, but we are now moments away from electing the 45th President of the United States. Given today's significance, we thought this might be an opportune time to highlight our U.S. Presidential Library.

Did you know HeinOnline has the most comprehensive collection of documents related to the Presidency in digital format?

HeinOnline's U.S. Presidential Library now contains more than 330 titles, 7,100 volumes, and 580,000 pages of content with titles such as: Messages and Papers of the Presidents, Public Papers of the Presidents

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