Research NCCUSL's UELMA In HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, NCCUSL
Shannon Sabo

Here in the legal world, we love our acronyms.

The Uniform Electronic Legal Material Act (UELMA) was approved by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL) in July 2011. Uniform law commissioners are appointed by their states to draft and promote enactment of uniform laws designed to solve problems common to all states.

UELMA was inspired by a 2007 American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) summit in which an AALL report found that "a significant number of the state online legal resources are official but none are authenticated or afford ready authentication by standard methods." The Act's purpose is to ensure that official online legal material has the same level of trustworthiness provided by traditional print law books…

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Research Entertainment Law and the Music Industry in HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Intellectual Property Law Collection, Law Journal Library
Shannon Sabo

Last week, the world lost another entertainment icon, Prince. His music crossed generations and genres alike, and after news of his untimely and sudden death broke, many donned purple and blasted his familiar hits. In Minnesota, Prince's home state, fans celebrated his life with dance parties. Prince, whose full name was Prince Rogers Nelson, was a singer and multiple-instrumentalist who was known for his flamboyant entertainment style and eclectic work.

While Prince initially helped to pioneer online distribution of music, his relationship with the internet became rather contentious. He was one of the first musicians to sell his music online, when his 1997 album Crystal Ball was released exclusively on the internet; he even won the Webby Lifetime Achievement Award in 2006…

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Legislative History of the USA Patriot Act in HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

In response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Congress rushed to pass legislation to alleviate the fears and concerns felt by Americans, and to strengthen national security. The result was the USA Patriot Act, or the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, signed by President George W. Bush on October 26, 2001. The Patriot Act impacted several existing acts available in HeinOnline's U.S. Statutes at Large library, including:

The USA Patriot Act addressed these acts in multiple ways…

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What Are Super PACs?

Case Law, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

For those following this year's election, the phrase "super PAC" is probably familiar, but even if you're trying to tune out the 2016 presidential race entirely, you might be interested to learn how super PACs can affect an election.

PAC stands for political action committee, and super PACs are allowed to raise unlimited sums of money from corporations, unions, and individuals and then spend that money to openly advocate for or against a political candidate. Unlike traditional PACs, however, super PACs are prohibited from donating money directly to political candidates, and their spending must not be coordinated with that of the candidates they benefit, according to opensecrets.org. Both traditional and super PACs advocate for or against a candidate by purchasing television…

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Celebrating National Library Week

Current Events, Law Librarianship, Libraries
Shannon Sabo

"Without libraries, what have we? We have no past and no future." -Ray Bradbury

As a corporate blogger, I have learned to be politically neutral, succinctly informative, and unfailingly professional. If I have feelings on a particular blog topic, it is my duty to ensure that my emotions are not reflected in the words I write for our readership and on behalf of the company I represent. Today, I am gleefully hurling this philosophy of dispassion out a 10-story window, because I absolutely cannot hold back my enthusiasm about the subject of today's blog: LIBRARIES.

"I have found the most valuable thing in my wallet is my library card." -Laura Bush

For children…

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Privacy and National Security: Apple, Inc. vs. the FBI

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code
Shannon Sabo

This past February, a judge in California ordered Apple, Inc. to help unlock an iPhone belonging to Syed Farook, one of the perpetrators of last December's San Bernardino shootings. A phone issued by Farook's employer was recovered by law enforcement and is locked with a four-digit password. Since too many incorrect attempts to guess the password will automatically wipe all data from the phone, the FBI has asked Apple to build a "back door" to this particular iPhone.

In an open letter to the public, Apple explains that they have provided requested data to the FBI on numerous occasions, and they regularly comply with valid search warrants and subpoenas…

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Why We Still "Spring Forward"

Current Events, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

For some, the second Sunday in March means only that their clocks are right for the first time in months. Others might wonder why, in 2016, we continue to follow the antiquated practice of Daylight Saving Time (DST). The basic concept behind DST is energy conservation, and the idea began in Germany during World War I. Eventually, it spread to the rest of Europe and the United States. Check out this infographic, which depicts highlights of the major legislation behind DST:

infographicdst

This brand new CRS Report, available in HeinOnline's U.S. Congressional Documents collection, elaborates on the various reasons for and the timeline of legislation surrounding DST…

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Take Another Look at Women and the Law in HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Women and the Law
Shannon Sabo

On February 29, President Obama issued this proclamation, which declared March 2016 to be Women's History Month and discussed the legacies of both prominent female trailblazers and women who are not included in history books. The proclamation addressed the progress that's been made, but acknowledged that work still remains to be done.

Women's History Month took root in 1909, when the first Women's Day occurred in New York City. It was organized by the Socialist Party and honored the anniversary of a garment workers' strike in which thousands of women marched for economic rights. Later, the National Women's History Project (NWHP) was founded in California after a group of women noticed that women were absent from history texts…

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How a City's Drinking Water Became Toxic, and What's Next

Current Events, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan has dominated national news since the story of contaminated water poisoning families, especially children, broke earlier this year when multiple states of emergency were declared. Adding fuel to the outrage is the fact that 57% of Flint's residents are black, and nearly half of residents live beneath the poverty line.

In April of 2014, the state of Michigan decided to save money by changing Flint's water supply from Lake Huron to the Flint River. This occurred during a financial state of emergency for Flint, and was supposed to be a temporary solution while a new state-run water supply line to Lake Huron was made ready for connection…

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The Short List of Supreme Court Candidates

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Shannon Sabo

Despite protests from Republican presidential candidates and Senate leaders, President Obama has made it clear that he intends to nominate a replacement for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who passed away suddenly on February 13. Based on reports from several news sources, including USA Today, Newsweek, PBS, and CNN, here is a short list of candidates who could receive the nomination.

Sri Srinivasan

Padmanabhan Srikanth Srinivasan, who once clerked for Sandra Day O'Connor, appeared on all four of the lists compiled by the above news outlets. He's only 48 years old…

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