Uneasy Lies the Head That Wears ‘The Crown’

Exploring HeinOnline, Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, World Constitutions Illustrated
Stephanie Ruesch

Last week, the nominees for the Golden Globes and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards were announced, with Season 4 of the Netflix drama The Crown reigning as the Globes’ most-nominated TV series of 2021 and tying at the SAGs for the most nominations for a TV show. Along with these accolades, this season of The Crown has also brought its fair share of controversy, primarily urging from the United Kingdom’s culture secretary that Netflix add a disclaimer warning viewers that the show is fictionalized, a call that stems primarily from Season 4’s portrayal of Prince Charles and Princess Diana’s tumultuous marriage; Netflix ultimately refused to add such a disclaimer…

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MyHein: A Staple for HeinOnline Researchers

Author Profile Pages, Current Index to Legal Periodicals (CILP), Exploring HeinOnline, MyHein, Training
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Free Upcoming Customer Training Session


Featuring: MyHein Personal Researching Tool


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A Power Researcher’s Best Friend

MyHein has evolved from its inception in 2008 as a bookmarking device to its present-day functionality as a multi-dimensional research tool relied upon by thousands of HeinOnline users. Throughout the years we have enhanced this tool time and time again to make your research experience a breeze. Let’s take a quick look at the various features this tool offers.

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A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down: A Brief History of Compulsory Vaccination

COVID-19, Exploring HeinOnline, Government Documents, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Medicine, State Reports: A Historical Archive, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Supreme Court
Stephanie Ruesch

Vaccination efforts against COVID-19 are underway across the world. In the United States, two vaccines have been authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for use, one developed by Moderna and one by Pfizer-BioNTech. Limitations on the amount of available doses have led the Centers for Disease Control to provide recommendations on who should be vaccinated first, but eventually the general public will be able to receive the vaccine. Its widespread availability will naturally lead to questions for both the public and for policy makers on whether vaccination against COVID-19 will be a requirement to board a plane, return to school, attend a concert…

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Researching Hein’s Uncontested Collection of U.S. Federal Legislative Histories

Exploring HeinOnline, Training, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Free Upcoming Customer Training Session


Featuring: U.S. Federal Legislative History Library


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About the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library

The U.S. Federal Legislative History Library contains thousands of titles from a number of sources, including the Government Printing Office, Arnold and Porter, Covington and Burling, Kirkland and Ellis, Van Ness Feldman, Pepper Hamilton, and more. William S. Hein & Co., Inc. also contracts with legal experts to compile and publish legislative histories on major public laws in-house. Over the past year…

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New Topic Taxonomy Brings “Categories” and “Subjects” into the HeinOnline Mix

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, New Features, Searching
Tara Kibler

If you’ve spent a fair amount of time in the Law Journal Library, you may be familiar with HeinOnline’s Topics.

Using a combination of human curation along with natural language processing and machine learning, we’ve extracted narrow research concepts from each article in the Law Journal Library database. This has provided a robust foundation of more than 1,500 distinct multidisciplinary concepts which we’ve used to categorize each and every Law Journal Library document.

We call these concepts “Topics.” Every document in the Law Journal Library is assigned at least one of these Topics, and these concepts have been made available for users when browsing and searching…

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Deck the Courts with Boughs of Establishment Clause Litigation

Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Religion & the Law, U.S. Supreme Court
Stephanie Ruesch

Last month, on Thanksgiving Day, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that New York State could not place attendance limits on places of worship in areas of the state that had been designated as coronavirus hot spots. The rules drafted by Governor Andrew Cuomo had stated that areas of the state designated as orange zones could have no more than 25 people attend each service; in areas designated as a red zone, that cap was at 10 people. Citing interference with the First Amendment’s guarantee of religious liberty, the current ruling by the Court reversed its position from earlier this year, when it upheld similar attendance limits enacted in California and Nevada…

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Tips from the Experts for Using the Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals

Exploring HeinOnline, IFLP
IFLP Editorial Team

The Index to Foreign Legal Periodicals (IFLP), the world’s only multilingual legal journal index, can help you assist patrons who seek credible foreign-language secondary law sources, from attorneys with transnational practices to students or faculty members researching comparative law topics. Established as a print resource by the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) in 1960, IFLP has since migrated to HeinOnline’s electronic research platform, making it even easier to use.


REGISTER FOR A FREE IFLP WEBINAR FROM AALL


How to Use the Index


BROWSING BY SUBJECT IN MULTIPLE LANGUAGES

In the IFLP…

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Breaking Down This Year’s Substantial Addition of Legislative Histories

Exploring HeinOnline, HeinOnline Updates, U.S. Federal Legislative History, What's New
Tara Kibler

Alongside the rest of our daily, weekly, and monthly content additions this year, we continued to expand the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library with additional statute coverage.

In total, 91 legislative histories were added to the database over the past 12 months, spanning more than 230,000 pages and covering a range of topics, from energy research and development to the president’s national emergency powers to music copyright in the streaming era.

About the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library

The U.S. Federal Legislative History Library contains thousands of titles from a number of sources, including the Government Printing Office, Arnold and Porter…

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Tip of the Week: Navigating within Titles, Volumes, Sections, and Pages

Exploring HeinOnline, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks
Tara Kibler

Here’s a scenario we’re all familiar with. You walk into your local library, quietly wave hello to your friendly neighborhood librarian, and head right to a particular shelf stocked with titles relevant to your needs. The titles on the shelf are all related to a specific discipline, publication type, or use, and when those titles are published as multi-part works or in a serial format, they’re broken out into individual volumes. Crack open one of those volumes to flip through to a particular section of the work—perhaps the title page, the appendix, or the index—or to dive right in to the main content.

HeinOnline’s image-based PDF titles are organized within a similar structure…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Iran-Contra Affair

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Foreign Affairs, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series by investigating the oft-overlooked Iran-Contra affair, a political scandal involving the Reagan Administration, Nicaraguan civil war, and the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.


The U.S. Congressional Serial Set is considered an essential publication for studying American history…

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