Set Your Cites on HeinOnline

Citations, Exploring HeinOnline, What's New
Kaylyn Zurawski

HeinOnline consistently strives to improve users’ research experiences by enhancing existing features and developing new tools.

The HeinOnline interface provides several tools related to citations. HeinOnline is easy to cite from and find citations in, and users are able to export citations to various platforms. Check out some of these cite tools below! 

Citation Tab

Easily retrieve a document by clicking the citation tab on the main search bar from any page in HeinOnline.

Citation Format Guide

To find proper abbreviations…

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Researching the Watergate Scandal: Part One

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Shannon Sabo

HeinOnline’s journal and government document coverage dates back to inception, enabling researchers to learn about key historical events from multiple perspectives. Read articles written about events as they occurred, and view exact replicas of original historical print publications; also, find current material discussing these same events with information gained through hindsight.

Research Example: The Watergate Scandal

Although the Watergate scandal happened in the early 1970s, it’s been in the news recently. Most people associate Watergate with President Richard M. Nixon’s eventual resignation, but what happened leading up to that? Here’s a brief synopsis of major events:

  • On June 17, 1972, five men were arrested after breaking into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee…

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Five Things You Can Do in Less Than 15 Seconds in HeinOnline

Exploring HeinOnline, Functionality
Shannon Sabo

Technological advancements have helped develop an information culture centered around instant gratification. In the research world, time is often critical when it comes to billable hours and project deadlines.  The HeinOnline support team has compiled a short list of tasks which can be accomplished in less than 15 seconds in HeinOnline. This list is by no means comprehensive.

NOTES

  • All tasks begin on the HeinOnline Welcome Page.
  • There are multiple ways to find material in HeinOnline; these are merely suggested methods.
  • If you happen to be a wicked-fast typist, you can probably beat our times and we encourage you to try.

1. Find a journal article by title

To find an article by title…

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The Refugee Crisis: Exploring U.S. Resettlement

Exploring HeinOnline, United Nations, World Treaty Library
Shannon Sabo

The world has faced multiple refugee crises, defined as movements of large groups of displaced people. Today, more than 60 million people worldwide have been forcibly displaced from their home countries due to political upheaval, violence, religious persecution, and a myriad of other reasons.

Refugees: Facts and Figures

According to refugees.org:

  • 60-70% of refugees live in urban areas as unrecognized residents
  • 20-30% live in camps, often for many years
  • Fewer than 0.1% are permanently resettled in a developed nation, such as the United States

According to pewresearch.org, the bulk of refugees admitted to the United States come from:

  • The Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Syria
  • Burma
  • Iraq
  • Somalia

The Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees

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Primary Sources, Secondary Sources and Beyond

Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase
Shannon Sabo

HeinOnline has long been known as an excellent platform for historical and current periodicals, books, and government documents. HeinOnline also has extensive case law coverage, much of which is provided through a partnership with Fastcase. The U.S. Reports, which contain the officially-published opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court, are available from inception to current in HeinOnline’s U.S. Supreme Court Library.

The partnership HeinOnline has with Fastcase provides access to case law from additional courts, including:

  • Federal circuit courts
  • Federal district courts
  • State appellate courts
  • Many more!

Coverage of case law powered by Fastcase dates back…

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“Seward’s Folly” or “Seward’s Icebox”: The Alaska Purchase

Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, Treaties and Agreements Library
Bonnie Hein

March 30, 2017 marked the 150th anniversary of the sale of the Alaska territory from Russia to the United States. Alaska later was approved by Congress for statehood on July 7, 1958 through the Alaska Statehood Act (72 Stat. 339). It was proclaimed the 49th state on January 3,1959 by President Eisenhower.

The Russian Federation had recently lost the Crimean War to an alliance of France, Britain, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia and was fearful Britain would seize Alaska in a future conflict.  Additionally, the Russians were fearful that if gold was discovered in Alaska, Americans would invade the territory.  At the time, the deal helped to establish a closer relationship with the United States and aggravated Britain…

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HeinOnline: Where Books Rule

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Libraries
Shannon Sabo

HeinOnline has comprehensive coverage of journals, treaties, constitutions from every country in the world, databases of bibliographic entries on multiple topics (many of which link to full-text content), and government documents. One component of HeinOnline that doesn’t receive as much attention is its impressive collection of books. It’s National Library Week and there’s nothing better than a good book, so be sure to take a closer look at the books available with your subscription.

Exploring the Database

There are more than 42,000 books* in HeinOnline, including legal and historical treatises, dictionaries, subject-specific texts, and current titles from the University of North Carolina Press

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Research Spotlight: Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Earl Warren

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

The month of March marks the birthdays of former Chief Justice Earl Warren and retired Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor of the Supreme Court of the United States, both of whom substantially impacted the United States Supreme Court and the American legal system.

Retired Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

Born on March 26, 1930 in El Paso, Texas, Sandra Day O’Connor spent much of her childhood on her family’s ranch in Arizona. She would grow up to be a pioneer for women, eventually serving as the first female Justice on the United States Supreme Court, for which she was unanimously approved by the Senate. While she is best known for this historical role…

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Michael Flynn and The Logan Act

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Government Documents
Bonnie Hein

After less than one month of service, retired U.S. Army lieutenant general Michael T. Flynn resigned as United States national security advisor on February 13, 2017 after a controversy arose about his prior conversations with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States.

Leading up to Flynn’s official resignation were allegations of inappropriate telephone discussions with Kislyak regarding the Obama administration’s expulsion of Russian diplomats and sanctions against Russia during the transition period prior to the inauguration of President Trump. He  subsequently misled Vice President Pence regarding these conversations.

Press coverage about the phone calls and presidential transition discussed the possibility of Mike Flynn potentially being subject to further punishment other than his resigning…

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Celebrating Presidents' Day with Abraham Lincoln and George Washington

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

presidentsday

Washington's Birthday or Presidents' Day?

The American holiday of Presidents' Day was originally established in 1885 in recognition of the first President of the United States, George Washington. It was officially called Washington's Birthday and observed as a federal holiday on February 22nd, Washington's actual day of birth. Washington's Birthday was the first federal holiday celebrating the life of an individual American, joining only four national bank holidays – Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving.

It became popularly known as Presidents' Day after it was moved by the 1971 Uniform Monday Holiday Act (82 Stat. 250) in order to create more three day weekends for American workers and increase retail and tourism revenue

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