Research Trending Legal Topics in HeinOnline

Access, Exploring HeinOnline, FAQ, Hein Blog, ScholarCheck
Bonnie Hein

trendinglegaltopics

 

HeinOnline's ScholarCheck is a series of tools which help researchers locate and access related material  from inside HeinOnline and via Fastcase. ScholarCheck also keeps track of the number of times articles are cited by other articles and cases. One of the more recent metrics tracked by ScholarCheck is the number of times articles have been accessed within a rolling 12-month period by other HeinOnline users. The HeinOnline development team recently ran a report of the articles which had the greatest increase in the number of times accessed between January 2016 and now, and some trending topics are discussed below.

Peer-to-Peer Marketplace

Companies such as Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb continue to grow the peer-to-peer marketplace addressing ride-sharing…

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Black History Month and Race Relations in the United States

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, U.S. Congressional Documents
admin

bhm

Each February, Americans honor both people and significant events in African-American history during Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month.

Among the myriad reasons Black History Month is important is the underrepresentation of people of color in standard history classes. For instance, the recently released biographical drama Hidden Figures depicts the story of three female African-American mathematicians who worked at NASA and were integral in getting American astronauts into space. Their names are nowhere near as widely discussed as John Glenn or Neil Armstrong, though their contributions to the space program were arguably as important.

Because underrepresentation of African Americans in traditionally-taught history has long been a problem, Black History Week was created in 1926…

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Researching Executive Power in HeinOnline

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Federal Register, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

whitehouse

Since President Donald Trump took office on January 20, he has issued several executive orders. To understand the importance and potential consequences of these actions, let's review legal scholarship on the topic in HeinOnline.

NOTE: HeinOnline's content is composed of image-based PDFs, which are exact replicas of original print documents, so authenticity is never a question. Also, we promise that none of the content will spontaneously vanish from the site.

A search for title: "executive order" OR title: "executive power" OR title: "presidential power" produces nearly 600 results in the Law Journal Library. Sort results by Number of Times Cited by Articles to view the most cited material first:

execi

The most-cited article from among these results is by Michael Stokes Paulsen

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NEW: HeinOnline Help Video Series Now Available!

Exploring HeinOnline, Navigating, Quimbee, Searching, Training, U.S. Congressional Documents, What's New
Shannon Sabo

HeinOnline is excited to announce a new help video series, created by the masterminds at Quimbee, which is now available on the HeinOnline YouTube channel!

About the HeinOnline Video Series

Several months ago, Quimbee approached the Hein Company with the idea to create a course for attorneys and students on the use of HeinOnline. After some initial collaboration, Quimbee took the information provided by HeinOnline’s support team and help page and ran with it, creating this incredible series of training videos. They have generously granted permission to feature this series on HeinOnline’s YouTube channel…

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Research the Effects of Opioids on Society

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Hein Blog, Searching, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

opioid-epidemic

A recent newspaper investigation revealed that drug wholesalers have shipped 780 million prescription painkillers to West Virginia over a six-year period. This amounted to more than 400 pills per person in West Virginia.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), six counties of West Virginia ranked in the top 10 in the nation for fatal pain pill overdoses. Between 2007 and 2012, more than 1,700 West Virginians died of hydrocodone or oxycodone overdoses, affecting generations of families and representing only a fragment of a growing national crisis.

More than 33,000 people in the United States were killed from opioid overdoses in 2015…

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The Extraordinary Cost to Inaugurate a President

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

Inauguration Facts and Figures

Presidential inaugurations have always been expensive, and experts estimate the cost of last week's inauguration of President Donald Trump and the accompanying celebrations to be anywhere between $175 million and $200 million. Here are some interesting facts:

  • Republicans and Democrats spend about the same amount for each inaugural celebration when the costs are adjusted for inflation.
  • Each year, critics lament the extraordinary cost.
  • The cost of a Presidential inauguration is split between private donors and taxpayers.
  • Events incorporated into the total cost of an inauguration include the swearing-in at the Capitol, the parade, official parties and dinners, inaugural balls, and security measures.

This Washington Post article summarizes inaugural events and their various price tags in a bit more detail…

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Happy Birthday Alexander Hamilton & Salmon P. Chase

Case Law, Exploring HeinOnline, Hein Blog, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

Beginning this year, we will be discussing notable figures in legal history and what information can be found on them in HeinOnline.  Last week marked the birthdays of Alexander Hamilton and Salmon P. Chase, both of whom greatly influenced the national banking system of the United States.

Alexander Hamilton (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873)

Over the past 2 years, much of America has heard of the revolutionary, hip-hop musical new to Broadway, Hamilton. With continued sold out performances on Broadway along with a national tour in 2017, this cultural phenomenon is far from over; even President Obama joined the Hamilton bandwagon.

Let’s not forget that the show is based upon one of our Founding Fathers…

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

Yesterday, the United States observed the holiday which marks Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.

Did you know?

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia with the original birth name of Michael King. His father was also named Michael King and later changed both his own and his son's name after a trip to Germany. The name Martin Luther was chosen in honor of the German religious reformer from the 1500s.

About Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.  He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights through nonviolent disobedience and for protesting racial discrimination in federal and state laws…

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Fact-Check to Avoid Spreading Fake News

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

Fake News: Then and Now

In 1938, Orson Welles directed and narrated an episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air that allegedly resulted in mass panic, as many listeners mistakenly thought the episode was a legitimate news broadcast. Titled "The War of the Worlds," the broadcast was composed of a series of simulated news bulletins about an alien invasion. It is hypothesized that people who tuned into the broadcast after its introduction, in which it was stated that program was a fictitious drama, believed the broadcast to be actual news, leading to phone calls to the radio station and panic. The degree to which the panic was widespread may have been overstated and is now a topic of debate among historians. 

Nearly 80 years later…

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Research Strange Events in American History

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

On June 4, 1947, the first high altitude data gathering balloon was launched from the Alamogordo Army Airfield in New Mexico. Officials later determined that remnants of this balloon were discovered on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico, prompting the start of what would later become known as the "Roswell Incident." This area still carries an air of mystery, possibly due to an extremely popular feature film directed by Steven Spielberg called Close Encounters of the Third Kindwhich dealt with UFOs and alien life forms.

Brief Timeline of Events
  • June 14, 1947: Foreman William Brazel notices debris at his place of employment, a ranch near Roswell…

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