Same DNA but Born this Way: A Look Back at Transgender History

Fastcase, Law Journal Library, LGBTQ, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, United Nations
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Although to many the term transgender seems relatively new, its roots can be traced back to ancient civilizations. Verbiage and categorizations have changed over time and vary in different cultures. This Pride month, we’ll take a look at the history of transgender people and how they are impacted by law today.

What Is Transgender?

Transgender is a term for people who have a gender identity or gender expression that differs from the sex that they were assigned to at birth. Even though some people identify as the sex opposite the one they were born with…

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Everything You Need to Know About Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The recent passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg opened up a seat on the United States Supreme Court, just weeks before the presidential election. On September 26th, President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative federal appeals court judge, to succeed Ginsburg. If confirmed, Barrett would keep the number of women serving on the Court at three, joining Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. She would also become the youngest member of the Court. Most importantly, she would likey cement a 6-3 conservative majority. Today we will explore Barrett’s career and where she stands on major constitutional issues using HeinOnline…

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Every Mind Matters: Researching Mental Health During National Suicide Prevention Week

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Law Journal Library
Lauren Mattiuzzo

This week is National Suicide Prevention Week, a campaign in the United States to draw attention to suicide prevention and reduce the stigma of mental health. Now more than ever, many Americans are facing stress and anxiety on a daily basis due to the coronavirus pandemic and lockdowns, the subsequent economic impact, and the ever-evolving civil rights crisis. Increased social isolation, lack of employment, and grief from losing a loved one are just a few reasons suicide is on the rise, although it has been for years.

Fast Facts on Suicide

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The Greatest Shows on Earth: County Fairs, Carnivals, and Circuses

Business and Legal Aspects of Sports and Entertainment, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Agency Library
Stephanie Ruesch

Ah, August. Here at HeinOnline headquarters, located in Great Lake-side Erie County, NY, we’re soaking up summer before the leaves start changing and the snow starts falling (and falling, and falling, and falling…). Discerning residents of Erie County know August is the superior summer month, for every year it brings the ultimate, unbeatable, uncontested best twelve days of summer: the Erie County Fair.

But COVID-19 has postponed this venerable celebration of agriculture and fried food until 2021, and this Hein blogger is feeling wistful about all the county fairs, carnivals, and circuses that have been sidelined until a summer when we are able to cease social distancing…

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From the Courtroom to the Streets: A Timeline of the Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter Movements

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Human Rights, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The recent arrest and death of George Floyd has sparked protesters against police brutality to flood the streets demanding change. With more than 450 protests occurring in towns and cities of the United States and across three continents, some are calling this the biggest civil rights movement yet. Join us as we explore past civil rights movements in U.S. history, and what changes have occurred as a result.

Timeline of Events

The official civil rights movement began in the late 1940s as a push to gain legal equality and the enforcement of civil rights for African Americans…

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Tip of the Week: How to Search Case Law with Fastcase

Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Searching, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks
Lauren Mattiuzzo

While HeinOnline includes a number of sources for locating case law, including our U.S. Supreme Court Library, Canada Supreme Court Reports, English Reports, and more, our partnership with Fastcase provides Core subscribers with access to additional case law jurisdictions. Fastcase, a leading next-generation legal research service, provides access to case law from additional courts such as federal circuit courts, federal district courts, state appellate courts, and much more. Let’s explore how to search case law with Fastcase in this week’s Tip of the Week!

How to Locate a Case

The Case Law tab located in the main search bar can be used to easily pull up a case citation…

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Reigning Supreme: All About the Highest Court in the United States

Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The Supreme Court of the United States, otherwise known as SCOTUS, is the highest tribunal in the nation for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution. It marks the boundaries of authority between state and nation, state and state, and government and citizen. Although SCOTUS receives approximately 7,000-8,000 petitions each term, the justices grant and hear oral arguments for about 80 cases annually. Let’s take a closer look at SCOTUS and see what unique resources you can find in HeinOnline.

Who Makes Up SCOTUS

The Supreme Court was established by Article III of the Constitution…

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I Saw A Tiger … in My Neighbor’s Backyard

Animal Law, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Culture & Law, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Federal Register, Popular Culture, Treaties and Agreements Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Stephanie Ruesch

In the early days of quarantine, nearly a hundred years ago, all the way back at the end of March, one thing united us all. No, not the sewing struggle to make our own masks or collective worrying over when we would ever see a roll of Charmin in the wild again. It was Tiger King. The true crime-character study-have-to-see-it-to-believe-it docuseries had more than 34 million views in the U.S. within its first 10 days on Netflix, and was an inescapable recommendation, topic of discussion, and fodder for many quality memes.

In case you somehow missed out, a brief synopsis: Tiger King chronicles the years-long feud between Oklahoma private zoo owner Joe Exotic (real name: Joseph Maldonado-Passage…

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Something Strange in the Neighborhood: The Ghostbusters Ruling

Fastcase, Law, Law Journal Library, Popular Culture
Tara Kibler

Did you know there was actually a case in which a house was declared legally haunted? This Halloween, expand your knowledge of spooky scary case law. Read all about the Ghostbusters ruling below.

Hauntings on the Hudson

In the late 1960s, a rundown Victorian house sat vacant, nestled atop a cliff overlooking the Hudson River. Built more than 70 years earlier, the mansion boasted nearly 5,000 square feet, intricate woodwork, and plenty of old-world charm.

Enter George and Helen Ackley, a married couple looking for a spacious waterfront home for themselves and their four children…

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Exploring Emojis and the Law

Fastcase, Hot Topic News, Law, Law Journal Library, Popular Culture, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Did you know that today is World Emoji Day? In recent years, emojis have evolved into an essential tool for expressing emotions and ideas, becoming nearly equivalent to words themselves. As of 2015, 92% of people use emojis in their online communications. Just check out this Emoji Tracker to view the realtime usage of emojis on Twitter. Furthermore, Oxford University Press named an emoji as its 2015 “Word of the Year.” Emojis are so popular that there was even a terrible movie made about them.

As true components of contemporary language, it’s no wonder that emojis are increasingly submitted as evidence in court cases all over the United States…

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