The Nuremberg Trials and Their Profound Impact on International Law

Highlights in History, International Law, Law Journal Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Seventy-three years ago today, the International Military Tribunal of the Nuremberg trials prosecuted the major parties responsible for the Holocaust and other World War II atrocities. The creation of the Nuremberg trials, their framework, and their outcomes were not only unprecedented but highly controversial. Learn about the trials and their impact with HeinOnline’s History of International Law database.

History of International Law*
Equipped with nearly 2,000 titles and more than 1.2 million pages of content dating back to 1690, History of International Law covers a variety of subjects such as war and peace, law of the sea, international arbitration, events at the Hague…

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Building America: The Powerful Story Behind “We the People”

Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

The Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America, the basis for the structure of the U.S. government, and the primary source for all legislative, executive, and judicial authority. Signed on September 17, 1787, the document became the first permanent constitution of its kind. The signing of the U.S. Constitution is commemorated with Constitution Day celebrations on September 17 of each year.

Originally consisting of seven articles, the Constitution outlined the framework for the newly established American government. As America has expanded over the past 232 years, the document has been amended to address the nation’s evolving needs. Join HeinOnline as we research the story behind the drafting…

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Remembering the Fallen: Researching the Tragedy of 9/11

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

On this day in 2001, the United States experienced the single worst terrorist attack in human history. The morning of Tuesday, September 11 saw four separate but coordinated attacks in various U.S. locations, which killed 2,966 people, injured more than 6,000 others, and resulted in billions of dollars in damages. The events of September 11th shocked the world, paving the way for a more aggressive, preemptive U.S. approach to foreign policy and national security. Join HeinOnline in understanding the tragedy and researching its impact as we remember the fallen.

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Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The United States Is No Longer Yours

Highlights in History, Treaties and Agreements Library, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

The Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 as a peace agreement between Great Britain and the United States of America to formally end the American Revolutionary War. Learn more about the evolution of the treaty with primary sources in HeinOnline.

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The Treaty of Paris


HISTORY OF THE TREATY

The American Revolutionary War began in 1775 when tensions increased between Great Britain and its thirteen colonies in North America…

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Social Security Turns 84: A History of Roosevelt’s Landmark Act

Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

You may have a Social Security number, but do you actually know why? On this day 84 years ago, the first act was signed to implement social security programs in the United States. Explore the origins of U.S. Social Security with HeinOnline.

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One Small Step for Man, 50 Years of Innovation for Mankind

Highlights in History, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

Just 66 years after Orville and Wilbur Wright took mankind to the air, the United States put a man on the moon. Tomorrow, the fiftieth anniversary of that first moon landing will be commemorated across the United States. Most U.S. citizens can tell you that Neil Armstrong was the first man to step foot on the moon, but fewer may understand the journey it took to get there. Launch into a history of the Space Race and the evolution of the Apollo program with HeinOnline.

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Chernobyl: Not Just Another HBO Drama

Federal Register, Highlights in History, Hot Topic News, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Thanks to the wildly popular HBO miniseries on the subject, the Chernobyl nuclear explosion of 1986 has become a hot topic in the news. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, an area covering approximately 1,000 square miles around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, has even become quite the tourist attraction. Journey with HeinOnline into the depths of the disaster, and learn a little more about nuclear energy in the U.S. while you’re at it.

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You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

Highlights in History, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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Juneteenth Day: Celebrating an End to Slavery in the United States

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Slavery in America and the World, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Today, people across the United States are commemorating the end to American slavery. Juneteenth Day—a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth”—is the oldest known celebration of African-American emancipation. Though truly the date of slavery’s end in Texas, the holiday has been generalized throughout the United States to honor the end of slavery in general. Recognized by 45 states as a special day of observance, Juneteenth is celebrated with readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, the singing of traditional songs, cookouts, historical reenactments, fairs, parties, and more.

Celebrate this turning point in U.S. history by exploring HeinOnline’s completely free Slavery in America and the World: History…

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