Social Security Turns 84: A History of Roosevelt’s Landmark Act

Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Hutchinson

You may have a Social Security number, but do you actually know why? On this day 84 years ago, the first act was signed to implement social security programs in the United States. Explore the origins of U.S. Social Security with HeinOnline.

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One Small Step for Man, 50 Years of Innovation for Mankind

Highlights in History, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Hutchinson

Just 66 years after Orville and Wilbur Wright took mankind to the air, the United States put a man on the moon. Tomorrow, the fiftieth anniversary of that first moon landing will be commemorated across the United States. Most U.S. citizens can tell you that Neil Armstrong was the first man to step foot on the moon, but fewer may understand the journey it took to get there. Launch into a history of the Space Race and the evolution of the Apollo program with HeinOnline.

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Chernobyl: Not Just Another HBO Drama

Federal Register, Highlights in History, Hot Topic News, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Hutchinson

Thanks to the wildly popular HBO miniseries on the subject, the Chernobyl nuclear explosion of 1986 has become a hot topic in the news. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, an area covering approximately 1,000 square miles around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, has even become quite the tourist attraction. Journey with HeinOnline into the depths of the disaster, and learn a little more about nuclear energy in the U.S. while you’re at it.

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You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

Highlights in History, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Hutchinson

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Hutchinson

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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Juneteenth Day: Celebrating an End to Slavery in the United States

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Slavery in America and the World, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Today, people across the United States are commemorating the end to American slavery. Juneteenth Day—a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth”—is the oldest known celebration of African-American emancipation. Though truly the date of slavery’s end in Texas, the holiday has been generalized throughout the United States to honor the end of slavery in general. Recognized by 45 states as a special day of observance, Juneteenth is celebrated with readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, the singing of traditional songs, cookouts, historical reenactments, fairs, parties, and more.

Celebrate this turning point in U.S. history by exploring HeinOnline’s completely free Slavery in America and the World: History…

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The Right to Remain Silent: 53 Years of Miranda Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Fifty-three years ago today, the landmark decision of Miranda v. Arizona significantly impacted law enforcement procedure, establishing that criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before being taken into police custody. The ruling held that if defendants are not informed of their right to remain silent and consult with an attorney, statements made while in police custody cannot be admissible as evidence.

Though the language may vary between jurisdictions, the “Miranda warning” has become so ingrained in U.S. society due to its portrayal in film and television that many can recite the common phrasing offhand. Lesser known, perhaps, are the details about the case that started it all…

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Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Current Events, Highlights in History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Session Laws, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

May 17, 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case, and then check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S. education.

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