All About Sonia Sotomayor

Author Profile Pages, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Sonia Sotomayor is known as the first woman of color, first Hispanic, and first Latina member of the Supreme Court of the United States. In addition to being the third woman to hold the position, she has a passion for reforming the criminal justice system. Sotomayor has often been referred to as the woman who saved baseball, from her 1995 preliminary injunction against Major League Baseball. In today’s blog, we’ll explore Sotomayor’s education, early legal career, and notable rulings.

From the Beginning

Sotomayor was born and raised in the Bronx…

Read More

Associate Justice Kavanaugh’s Nomination Hearings Added to History of Supreme Court Nominations

HeinOnline Updates, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

HeinOnline is pleased to announce that we’ve now completed the online volumes in The Supreme Court of the United States: Hearings and Reports on Successful and Unsuccessful Nominations of Supreme Court Justices by the Senate Judiciary Committee. We were able to complete this series with the latest release of Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings, material so voluminous that it comprises 8 volumes. Find it all in HeinOnline’s History of Supreme Court Nominations database.


VIEW THE NEW KAVANAUGH VOLUMES


Dive into this post to learn a bit more about Associate Justice Kavanaugh, his background, and his time on the Supreme Court.

Kavanaugh’s Background and Nomination


Education and Early Work

After attending high school at Georgetown Preparatory School in Bethesda…

Read More

Deck the Courts with Boughs of Establishment Clause Litigation

Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Religion & the Law, U.S. Supreme Court
Stephanie Ruesch

Last month, on Thanksgiving Day, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that New York State could not place attendance limits on places of worship in areas of the state that had been designated as coronavirus hot spots. The rules drafted by Governor Andrew Cuomo had stated that areas of the state designated as orange zones could have no more than 25 people attend each service; in areas designated as a red zone, that cap was at 10 people. Citing interference with the First Amendment’s guarantee of religious liberty, the current ruling by the Court reversed its position from earlier this year, when it upheld similar attendance limits enacted in California and Nevada…

Read More

Marbury v. Madison: The Most Important Decision in American Constitutional Law

History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Statutes at Large, Treaties and Agreements Library, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

This past Tuesday, the Affordable Care Act returned to the Supreme Court for the third time. Opponents argue that the health insurance mandate included in the legislation is unconstitutional, and that the entire act should therefore be struck down.

You may be wondering, from where does the Supreme Court derive this power? To discover the answer, travel with HeinOnline back to the turn of the nineteenth century.

The Election of 1800

This story starts with a presidential election, which, we have to say, is a much more enjoyable phenomenon to look back on than to experience. The main candidates were incumbent President John Adams—a Federalist favoring strong central government—and Vice President Thomas Jefferson…

Read More

Everything You Need to Know About Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The recent passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg opened up a seat on the United States Supreme Court, just weeks before the presidential election. On September 26th, President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative federal appeals court judge, to succeed Ginsburg. If confirmed, Barrett would keep the number of women serving on the Court at three, joining Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. She would also become the youngest member of the Court. Most importantly, she would likey cement a 6-3 conservative majority. Today we will explore Barrett’s career and where she stands on major constitutional issues using HeinOnline…

Read More

I Dissent: The Life and Legacy of the Incomparable Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Author Profile Pages, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

This past weekend, the nation lost one of its biggest social justice warriors, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After serving on the Supreme Court of the United States for nearly three decades, Ginsburg passed away from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at the age of 87. She was the second female justice, after Sandra Day O’Connor, to serve on the Court and was well known for her fiery dissents, her tireless fight for gender equality, and her ability to overcome adversity. Although she weighed only 100 lbs, this 5’1″ feminist icon was larger than life.

The Beginning of Greatness

Ruth Bader Ginsburg attended Cornell…

Read More

McGirt v. Oklahoma: A Historic Win for Native American Rights

History of Supreme Court Nominations, Indigenous Peoples of the Americas, Law Journal Library, State Constitutions Illustrated, Statutes at Large, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

This summer, a landmark decision from the Supreme Court marked a historic win for Native American tribes, acknowledging their rights and forever transforming the justice system of the state of Oklahoma.

In case you missed it, reports rang out through July and August that half of the state had been ruled Native American land. However, in many cases, the headlines were misleading. Yes, the Supreme Court came to a major decision about criminal jurisdiction in Oklahoma—but no, the Court did not rule specifically on land ownership.

Curious about how it all went down? Explore the landmark decision, its background, and what was actually affected by the ruling with HeinOnline…

Read More

Reigning Supreme: All About the Highest Court in the United States

Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The Supreme Court of the United States, otherwise known as SCOTUS, is the highest tribunal in the nation for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution. It marks the boundaries of authority between state and nation, state and state, and government and citizen. Although SCOTUS receives approximately 7,000-8,000 petitions each term, the justices grant and hear oral arguments for about 80 cases annually. Let’s take a closer look at SCOTUS and see what unique resources you can find in HeinOnline.

Who Makes Up SCOTUS

The Supreme Court was established by Article III of the Constitution…

Read More

Proud to Be Born This Way: A Look Back at the Road to Pride and LGBTQ Rights

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Human Rights, Law Journal Library, LGBTQ, Statutes at Large, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

This June marks a special month for the LGBTQ community. Not only is it Pride month, but it’s also the 50th anniversary of annual LGBTQ and Pride traditions. The very first Pride march took place on the one-year anniversary of the Stonewall Uprising in New York City on June 28, 1970. More than 500 Pride-related events have been canceled this year due to the COVID pandemic, but that hasn’t stopped people from celebrating. The LGBTQ community has found ways to celebrate online, and others are marching in black lives matter protests to elevate black voices in solidarity for equal rights. Let’s take a closer look at this movement…

Read More

The Life and Career of Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black

American History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Pentagon Papers, Statutes at Large, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Eighty-two years ago, Hugo Lafayette Black was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. The fifth-longest serving justice, an avid New Deal supporter, and a former Ku Klux Klansman, Hugo Black proved to be controversial yet influential in the outcome of landmark Supreme Court decisions. Read about Justice Black’s jurisprudence and Supreme Court career with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

Read More