Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

American History, Current Events, Education, Highlights in History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Session Laws, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

May 17, 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case, and then check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S. education.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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Researching the Right to Die

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Human Rights, Law, Medicine
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The concept of the ‘right to die’ is fraught with controversy and legal issues. Euthanasia, or the practice or act of bringing about the painless death of a hopelessly sick or injured individual, and assisted suicide, in which a physician or other health care professional assists a patient with causing his or her own death, are two main ideas involved in the discussion of the right to die. Euthanasia is divided into two categories: passive, in which something is not done that would preserve a patient’s life, and active, in which something is done to end a patient’s life.

Currently, euthanasia is legal in the Netherlands, Belgium, Colombia…

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Capital Punishment Research Resources in HeinOnline

Case Law, Criminal Justice, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Capital Punishment, Human Rights, Law, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases
Shannon Furtak

Capital punishment is one of the most controversial issues facing global society, both today and historically. Many countries have abolished the death penalty. Those which have not include the United States, China, India, Japan, and most Islamic states. The United States is the only Western nation still using capital punishment.

Proponents of the death penalty argue that it is a deterrent to crime, prevents offenders from committing further crimes, and is a tool prosecutors and police can use when plea bargaining with defendants. Opponents believe capital punishment is inhumane, discriminates against poor and minority defendants, and does not actually deter crime.

Death Penalty Fast Facts

  • Since 1976…

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Racial Disparity and Lethal Force

Criminal Justice, Current Events, Human Rights, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

A study published in February by the American Journal of Public Health was conducted to update previous examinations of racial/ethnic disparities in the use of lethal force by law enforcement in the United States. According to the study, black men are nearly three times as likely to be killed by legal intervention than white men. Additionally, American Indians or Alaska Natives are also nearly three times as likely and Hispanic men are nearly twice as likely to be killed. View the full report here.

Study Results

James Buehler…

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Time’s Up, #MeToo, and the Equal Rights Amendment

Current Events, Human Rights, Law, Popular Culture, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Kaylyn Zurawski

Is the Future Female?

In many ways, 2017 was a historic year for women’s empowerment in the United States. First there was the Women’s March for human rights, and then came movements such as Time’s Up and #MeToo, which began in response to a wave of allegations of sexual abuse against men in power, from Hollywood to the White House. And while these movements have dispelled silence, increased solidarity, and brought forth a call for change, many say there is still much work to be done, and that begins with passing legal protections for women.

More than 80% of Americans don’t know women are not guaranteed equal rights in the U.S…

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Deadly Shootings and Gun Laws

American History, Current Events, Human Rights, Law, Political Science, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

In the first seven weeks of 2018, there have been several school shootings in the United States. The latest occurred on Valentine’s Day in Parkland, Florida, where seventeen people were killed. With the latest school shootings, and other mass shootings, there has been on ongoing debate circling gun laws. Let’s take a look at what has been happening and what laws are currently in place.

Timeline of Deadly Shootings

Looking back at the past ten years, there have been seven particularly deadly shootings. Two of the five deadliest shootings took place within a month of each other in late 2017…

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Anti-Vaccination Movement and the Flu

Current Events, Human Rights, Medicine, Popular Culture, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

It is officially flu season. The dominant strain this season is the H3N2 strain, known to cause more hospitalizations and deaths than other strains. Although the flu shot’s effectiveness cannot yet be calculated, experts are expecting it to be about 30% effective. The severity of this year’s flu has contributed to the ongoing vaccination debate.

Facts about the Flu

Influenza (“the flu”) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every state in the U.S…

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