Game of Drones: The Battle for Flight

Current Events, Law, Popular Culture, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

A drone, more formally known as an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), is an aircraft without a human pilot onboard. Drones operate with various degrees of autonomy, either under remote control by a human operator or autonomously by onboard computers. UAVs originated in military applications for missions that were dirty or dangerous. However, drones are used for more than just military needs, and because of that, regulation issues arise.

What Drones Are Used For

Although the origin of drones began with military use, drones are expanding to commercial, scientific…

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Millennials Are Changing the World: Don’t @ Me

Content News, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, What's New
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Triggering Change

The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary defines millennials as those born roughly between the 1980s and 1990s. Also known as Generation Y, this demographic cohort is most known for their use and familiarity with communications, media, and digital technologies. In relation to older generations, millennials tend to support political correctness and have drawn attention to implementing “safe spaces” and “trigger warnings,” bringing changes to higher education.

This generation has also been referred to as the “Peter Pan generation.” Research shows they tend to delay certain rites of passage into adulthood for longer periods than most generations before them. Although they sometimes get a bad rap…

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Researching the Right to Die

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Human Rights, Law, Medicine
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The concept of the ‘right to die’ is fraught with controversy and legal issues. Euthanasia, or the practice or act of bringing about the painless death of a hopelessly sick or injured individual, and assisted suicide, in which a physician or other health care professional assists a patient with causing his or her own death, are two main ideas involved in the discussion of the right to die. Euthanasia is divided into two categories: passive, in which something is not done that would preserve a patient’s life, and active, in which something is done to end a patient’s life.

Currently, euthanasia is legal in the Netherlands, Belgium, Colombia…

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Capital Punishment Research Resources in HeinOnline

Case Law, Criminal Justice, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Capital Punishment, Human Rights, Law, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases
Shannon Furtak

Capital punishment is one of the most controversial issues facing global society, both today and historically. Many countries have abolished the death penalty. Those which have not include the United States, China, India, Japan, and most Islamic states. The United States is the only Western nation still using capital punishment.

Proponents of the death penalty argue that it is a deterrent to crime, prevents offenders from committing further crimes, and is a tool prosecutors and police can use when plea bargaining with defendants. Opponents believe capital punishment is inhumane, discriminates against poor and minority defendants, and does not actually deter crime.

Death Penalty Fast Facts

  • Since 1976…

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The Times They Are a-Changin’

Current Events, Law, Popular Culture, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Kid Rock, the Beach Boys and Mike Love were among some of the musicians who joined President Donald Trump at the signing ceremony earlier this month for the Music Modernization Act (MMA). This bill was unanimously passed through the House and Senate prior to reaching the President’s desk. MMA was designed to fix copyright issues revolving around digital steaming services such as Apple Music, Spotify and Pandora. The new digital wave of streaming made music more accessible; however, artists were losing out on revenue because of this new technology. MMA revamps Section 115 of the U.S. Copyright Act and is a combination of three bills previously introduced in Congress…

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NAFTA: Reviewed, Revised, Renamed

Current Events, Economics, Foreign Affairs, Law, Political Science, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Changes are on the rise for the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Mexico, and Canada. These three countries met and negotiated a last-minute agreement, which revised and could ultimately replace, NAFTA. This new agreement would be called USMCA, standing for the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. President Donald Trump, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and President Enrique Pena Nieto and are expected to sign the deal by the end of November, when it will then be passed to Congress to approve. Read below for a brief summary of USMCA negotiation terms.

New Negotiating Terms

Got Milk…

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Do Not Pass Go: Will Amazon’s Monopoly Be Subject to Regulations?

Current Events, Economics, Law, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Today there are more than 100 million Amazon Prime members worldwide. This American electronic commerce and cloud computing company was started in 1994 by Jeff Bezos in Seattle, Washington. Although it began as an online bookstore, it now sells video games, electronics, apparel, furniture, food, toys, jewelry, and more. Users can stream Oscar-winning movies and music, as well as listen to audio books. Amazon’s low prices and fast delivery are raising the bar for competitors and keeping customers happy. This past month, Amazon reached $1 trillion in value, falling second only to Apple. But, should the changing economy be subject to new rules? Lina Khan thinks so…

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Most-Cited U.S. Supreme Court Cases in HeinOnline: Part III

Exploring HeinOnline, Law, ScholarCheck, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Almost ten years ago, we blogged about how we applied scholarly indexing to the U.S. Supreme Court Library. Then, a few months later we announced that we added links for users to access the articles which cite cases in HeinOnline, otherwise known as Hein’s ScholarCheck. Check out this snippet of our old interface from 2008!

What’s new since our last two blog posts? We have drastically updated our interface, and not only can users access articles which cite a case, but they can also access cases which cite a case! Fast forward nearly ten years, and let’s now take a look at the top 50 most-cited U.S…

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You Can Bet On It: The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act

Current Events, Law, Navigating, Popular Culture
Kaylyn Zurawski

Game Over

Recently, in a 6-to-3 decision, the Supreme Court ruled in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), which was consolidated with the New Jersey Thoroughbred Horse Men’s Association v. NCAA, to allow each of the 50 states to decide whether to permit sports betting. For the past 25 years, the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PAPSA) had limited legal sports betting to one state (plus 4 more that had been grandfathered in). Check out Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases’ write-up on New Jersey Thoroughbred Horsemen’s Association v. NCAA.

In the conclusion of the decision…

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The Supreme Court and Workers’ Rights

Current Events, Law, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Three cases were brought before the Supreme Court on May 21st, involving tens of thousands of nonunion employees. The cases were brought against Ernst & Young, LLP; Epic Systems Corporation; and Murphy Oil USA, Inc. to rule whether or not class action waivers were a violation of the National Labor Relations Act. The Supreme Court ruled by a 5-4 vote that employers can use contracts with workers to ban them from joining class-action lawsuits, as well as mandating individual arbitration in the event of a dispute.

About the Cases

The three companies involved in the Supreme Court case required their employees to waive their rights to join a class-action suit…

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