Climate Change, the Environment and the Law

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Searching, The Environment
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The topic of climate change has been more prevalent in the past few years as global temperatures have risen. This challenging and complex issue affects everyone, everywhere. This blog discusses the definition of climate change, the current U.S. government administration’s policies on and responses to this change, and how users can research this topic in HeinOnline.

Climate Change

Climate change is defined as a change in global or regional climate patterns over an extended period of time. This change can include a shift in average weather conditions or a variation of weather within long-term conditions…

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Time’s Up, #MeToo, and the Equal Rights Amendment

Current Events, Human Rights, Law, Popular Culture, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Kaylyn Zurawski

Is the Future Female?

In many ways, 2017 was a historic year for women’s empowerment in the United States. First there was the Women’s March for human rights, and then came movements such as Time’s Up and #MeToo, which began in response to a wave of allegations of sexual abuse against men in power, from Hollywood to the White House. And while these movements have dispelled silence, increased solidarity, and brought forth a call for change, many say there is still much work to be done, and that begins with passing legal protections for women.

More than 80% of Americans don’t know women are not guaranteed equal rights in the U.S…

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Legislative Intent and Statutory Interpretation

Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

In cases that involve a statute, there is often a need for statutory interpretation. Some statutes can have straightforward meanings, while others can be ambiguous. In cases where a statute may be vague, judges must step in to decipher the legislative intent.

Statutory Interpretation

The language is the most important part of a statute. If the language itself is straightforward and plain, it must be applied according to its terms. However, if a statute is unclear, the interpretative process begins. Read about this process in the CRS Report…

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Celebrating Women’s History Month: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Affectionately Known as The Notorious RBG

Law, Navigating, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Kaylyn Zurawski

Her Team Supreme

On August 10th, 1993, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as the 107th Supreme Court justice, making her the second woman and first Jewish female justice to sit on the distinguished bench. Since being sworn in, Justice Ginsburg has established herself in America’s history as a legend— and not just for her decisions in the courtroom. 

Ginsburg is a graduate of Cornell University and Columbia Law School, where she tied for first in her class. Before she became a judge, she spent her career as an advocate for the advancement of women’s rights as a constitutional principle…

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Do You Know How Much You’re Eating?

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Medicine, Popular Culture, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

By May 7th, 2018, restaurants and food establishments in the United States will be required to comply with requirements to add calorie information labels to foods that are offered and served. In early February, the House passed legislation which would amend how restaurants would provide the calorie count. Although restaurant owners are in favor of the updated legislation, public health experts are raising concerns.

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, was enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by former President Barack Obama on March 23…

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Citizens United and Its Impact on Campaign Financing: A Brief Overview

Current Events, Economics, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Political Science
Shannon Furtak

Money and politics have strolled hand-in-hand since the founding of the United States, when wealthy, well-connected candidates financed their own political campaigns and were essentially the only people who ran for office. In fact, George Washington spent about $8,000 in today’s currency on alcohol to “treat” voters on election day.

Andrew Jackson was the first presidential candidate who didn’t come from a wealthy background. He ran for office for the second time in 1828 and became the first organized campaigner.  While he didn’t seek financial support, he was an early practitioner of rewarding political loyalists with the only thing some find more valuable than money: power…

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Deadly Shootings and Gun Laws

American History, Current Events, Human Rights, Law, Political Science, Searching
Lauren Mattiuzzo

In the first seven weeks of 2018, there have been several school shootings in the United States. The latest occurred on Valentine’s Day in Parkland, Florida, where seventeen people were killed. With the latest school shootings, and other mass shootings, there has been on ongoing debate circling gun laws. Let’s take a look at what has been happening and what laws are currently in place.

Timeline of Deadly Shootings

Looking back at the past ten years, there have been seven particularly deadly shootings. Two of the five deadliest shootings took place within a month of each other in late 2017…

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Now We Got Bad Blood: Taylor Swift & Copyright Law

Intellectual Property Law Collection, Law, Navigating, Popular Culture
Kaylyn Zurawski

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Haters Gonna Hate

Recently, singer-songwriter Taylor Swift has had to shake off claims that she stole her lyrics for her famous 2014 hit single “Shake It Off.” Call it what you want, but Swift has caused some bad blood in the industry, and this isn’t the only time she has been accused of stealing lyrics; it’s an accusation she knows all too well.

In 2015, musician Jessie Braham claimed lyrics from “Shake It Off” were stolen from his song “Haters Gone Hate.” The case was dismissed on the grounds that the complaint didn’t rise above the speculative level. In September of 2017…

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Profile of Judge Jon O. Newman

Law
Shannon Furtak

“If Jon Newman were a sports figure, he would be the perennial winner of the most valuable player award for his contributions to the administration of justice.”
-Robert A. Katzmann, Chief Judge of the Second Circuit

Judge Jon O. Newman is the author of Hein’s top-selling book of 2017, Benched, but he’s also a well-known and prolific figure in the judicial community. So much so, in fact, that Benched has a foreword by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor and it was recently reviewed by U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff in the prestigious New York Review of Books:

“…in his autobiography…

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