Hope and Change: Revisiting Barack Obama’s Historic Presidency

American History, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Statutes at Large, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

More than a decade ago, Barack Obama became not only the 44th president of the United States, but also the first African-American to serve in the office. His unique backstory, eloquence and charisma, and platform of hope and change won him the presidency, but what did he accomplish during his two terms? Join HeinOnline as we explore the highlights of those historic eight years with the most comprehensive presidential collection available in digital format: HeinOnline’s U.S. Presidential Library.

The U.S. Presidential Library holds more than 780 titles consisting of nearly 800,000 pages. The database includes Messages and Papers of the Presidents

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Impeachment of Bill Clinton

American History, Criminal Justice, Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Political Science, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

As of this month, it’s been a year since our initial release of the Serial Set in HeinOnline … celebrate with another installment of our Secrets of the Serial Set series! This month, we dive into the events surrounding the 1998 impeachment of President William Jefferson Clinton.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Join us each month to explore notable events in U.S. history using the primary sources themselves. Grab a seat and prepare to be blown away by what the Serial Set has to offer…

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It’s Getting Hot in Here: The Cuban Missile Crisis and the Cold War

American History, Foreign Affairs, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

More than 50 years ago, the discovery of Soviet missiles in Cuba led to a 13-day standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union. After spending 16 years in a Cold War, the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 remains the closest the two superpowers ever came to an all-out nuclear conflict. Tense negotiations and risky moves on the part of the Kennedy administration neutralized the conflict, but the terror incited by the crisis still shook the globe. Regardless, the Cold War continued on until its official end in 1991—though some argue it still exists today. Explore the events of the Cuban Missile Crisis and its legacy with HeinOnline…

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A Columbus Day Exploration of Indigenous American History

American History, American Indian, Holidays and Observances, Human Rights, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Political Science, Statutes at Large, World Constitutions Illustrated, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

On this day each October, we observe the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas in 1492. However, the often-devastating impact of “Western” influences on indigenous Americans has led some to be wary of celebrating the man who started it all. As a solution, many have begun to counter-celebrate with “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” in honor of American Indian history and culture.

Regardless of your stance on Columbus Day, one thing is certain—albeit dark at times, American Indians have a rich and storied history which is forever entwined with the evolution of the United States. Join us as we explore that history with HeinOnline’s American Indian Law Collection and other relevant databases…

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Tip of the Week: Locating a Congressional Hearing in HeinOnline

Exploring HeinOnline, Political Science, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents
Tara Kibler

HeinOnline’s U.S. Congressional Documents holds more than 70,500 congressional hearings. That’s a lot to sift through! Luckily, we’ve created the Congressional Hearings Quick Finder Tool to help you quickly and easily locate the hearing you have in mind.

Follow along with this post to discover how to find some of the most famous congressional hearings, and then try it yourself!

The Congressional Hearings Quick Finder

Let’s go back just a few years to former FBI Director James Comey’s highly publicized hearing before the United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI). In 2017…

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Tip of the Week: Researching Impeachment in HeinOnline

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library
Lauren Mattiuzzo

HeinOnline’s vast collection of government documents, academic journals, and case law allow users to stay up-to-date with current events in our world. Today, let’s take a look at what resources are available in HeinOnline to impress your friends with your knowledge on recent breaking news!

Impeachment Inquiry on Donald Trump

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Tuesday that Democratic leaders were launching an official impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. This decision came after a phone call Trump recently made to the president of Ukraine, allegedly asking him to investigate former Vice President and potential presidential challenger Joe Biden…

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Building America: The Powerful Story Behind “We the People”

American History, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Law, Political Science, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

The Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America, the basis for the structure of the U.S. government, and the primary source for all legislative, executive, and judicial authority. Signed on September 17, 1787, the document became the first permanent constitution of its kind. The signing of the U.S. Constitution is commemorated with Constitution Day celebrations on September 17 of each year.

Originally consisting of seven articles, the Constitution outlined the framework for the newly established American government. As America has expanded over the past 232 years, the document has been amended to address the nation’s evolving needs. Join HeinOnline as we research the story behind the drafting…

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Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The United States Is No Longer Yours

American History, Foreign Affairs, Highlights in History, Political Science, Treaties and Agreements Library, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

The Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 as a peace agreement between Great Britain and the United States of America to formally end the American Revolutionary War. Learn more about the evolution of the treaty with primary sources in HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

The Treaty of Paris


HISTORY OF THE TREATY

The American Revolutionary War began in 1775 when tensions increased between Great Britain and its thirteen colonies in North America…

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The Watergate Scandal, Part III: The Serial Set

American History, Criminal Justice, Exploring HeinOnline, Political Science, Searching, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

In 2017, we published two posts about researching the Watergate scandal in HeinOnline. The first post demonstrated how to research the scandal using HeinOnline resources such as the Law Journal Library. The second focused on Watergate’s connection to the Pentagon Papers.

With the continued growth of HeinOnline’s U.S. Congressional Serial Set, even more material on Nixon and Watergate has become available. Catch up on the first two installments of this series, and then continue on to Part III: The U.S. Congressional Serial Set.

Quick Recap: Timeline of Watergate Events

  • June 1972: Five men are arrested after breaking into the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate complex in Washington…

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Social Security Turns 84: A History of Roosevelt’s Landmark Act

American History, Economics, Highlights in History, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

You may have a Social Security number, but do you actually know why? On this day 84 years ago, the first act was signed to implement social security programs in the United States. Explore the origins of U.S. Social Security with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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