Tip of the Week: How to Locate a House or Senate Report in HeinOnline

Tip of the Week, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Committee reports are considered to be one of the most important documents of legislative history research. These reports are produced by the House and Senate committees that address legislative and other policy issues, investigations, and internal committee matters. Each report can be identified by standardized citation that includes the Congress, chamber (House or Senate), and report number. Watch the quick tutorial below or continue reading to learn how to easily retrieve a House or Senate report in HeinOnline.

Where to Find a Committee Report

HeinOnline contains two collections that include House and Senate Reports…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Sinking of the Titanic

Exploring HeinOnline, Foreign Affairs, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series with a look back on the disastrous sinking of the RMS Titanic.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.


LEARN MORE ABOUT THE SERIAL SET

These posts have been so informative; they enable both patrons and staff to understand what the Serial Set is and how invaluable it is to all kinds of research…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: Education in America

American History, Education, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series with a look at the evolution of education throughout American History.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.

These posts have been so informative; they enable both patrons and staff to understand what the Serial Set is and how invaluable it is to all kinds of research…

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Dr. Mary Edwards Walker, Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, Women's Studies
Stephanie Ruesch

The Medal of Honor is America’s highest military honor, awarded by the President in the name of Congress for extraordinary acts of valor. First presented in 1863 to the surviving Andrews Raiders, Union soldiers who volunteered to commandeer the Confederate train The General, the Medal of Honor has since been awarded more than 3,500 times. The criteria and design of the Medal has changed since 1863, and today three variants of the Medal exist: one for the Department of the Army (awarded to soldiers), one for the Department of the Navy (awarded to sailors, marines, and coast guardsmen)…

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Beatings, Battles, and Brawls: Congressional Violence in the Antebellum Era

American History, Political Science, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

When any slightly incendiary word is uttered in Congress, the media is quick to report it. Today, live coverage of congressional proceedings and social media-driven insta-news has made us all well aware of any tiffs, squabbles, or fallings-out in Washington. As a result, we’re also well aware that strong disagreement in the Capitol is, as to be expected, very common.

There was a time in American history, though, when disagreements became so heated that they turned physical, ranging from a singular blow to a vicious beating, and even to murder. In the pre-Civil War era, Congress saw at least 70 violent incidents between its members. Let’s just say that if C-SPAN had existed in the early 1800s…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico

American History, Foreign Affairs, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series by delving into the question of Puerto Rico—how did the island become a U.S. territory? As U.S. citizens, how do Puerto Ricans participate in American democracy? Should the territory ultimately become an American state?

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.


The U.S. Congressional Serial Set is considered an essential publication for studying American history…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: The Iran-Contra Affair

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Foreign Affairs, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series by investigating the oft-overlooked Iran-Contra affair, a political scandal involving the Reagan Administration, Nicaraguan civil war, and the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Secrets of the Serial Set is an exciting and informative monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Documents from additional HeinOnline databases have been incorporated to supplement research materials for non-U.S. related events discussed.


The U.S. Congressional Serial Set is considered an essential publication for studying American history…

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Tip of the Week: Researching the Career of a Senator

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

The ability to thoroughly investigate and analyze the activity of Congress and its members is crucial for historical research projects, understanding current events, and these days, especially, for becoming a more informed voter during election time.

Discover a few ways to research the life and career of a U.S. senator, in particular, with this tip of the week. We’d like to thank Staci Green, Head of Library Operations at Dickinson State University, for her recent question, which inspired this blog post!

Start with the Basics

Before diving into the nitty gritty of database research, you’ll want to check and see if any relevant titles have already been compiled…

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Where the Wild Things Are: Hunting Regulations

Exploring HeinOnline, Government Documents, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library
Stephanie Ruesch

Fall’s arrival brings a chill to the air, changing colors to the leaves, and pumpkin spice flavoring to more products than necessary. But for many people, fall’s arrival also brings on an acute case of buck fever, alleviated only by long hours in a tree stand, or for others the urge to sit near the water in a duck blind with a bird call in hand, waiting for a fast-flying fowl. For these outdoorsmen and women, the change in weather means the start of the much-anticipated fall hunting season.

Hunting in America is primarily regulated at the state level, with additional regulations coming from federal laws that protect endangered species and migratory birds…

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About the “First Lady of the World”

American History, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library, United Nations, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Tara Kibler

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt is well-known for her role as First Lady to the longest-sitting president in American history. In reality, she was much more than that, demonstrating throughout her life that she was also, among many things, an accomplished businesswoman, a passionate civil rights activist, and a skillful diplomat.

This past Sunday would have been Eleanor Roosevelt’s 136th birthday. Join HeinOnline in exploring ten lesser-known facts about the unforgettable “First Lady of the World” with the following databases:

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