Tip of the Week: How to Locate a House or Senate Report in HeinOnline

Tip of the Week, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Committee reports are considered to be one of the most important documents of legislative history research. These reports are produced by the House and Senate committees that address legislative and other policy issues, investigations, and internal committee matters. Each report can be identified by standardized citation that includes the Congress, chamber (House or Senate), and report number. Watch the quick tutorial below or continue reading to learn how to easily retrieve a House or Senate report in HeinOnline.

Where to Find a Committee Report

HeinOnline contains two collections that include House and Senate Reports…

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Researching Hein’s Uncontested Collection of U.S. Federal Legislative Histories

Exploring HeinOnline, Training, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

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Featuring: U.S. Federal Legislative History Library


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About the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library

The U.S. Federal Legislative History Library contains thousands of titles from a number of sources, including the Government Printing Office, Arnold and Porter, Covington and Burling, Kirkland and Ellis, Van Ness Feldman, Pepper Hamilton, and more. William S. Hein & Co., Inc. also contracts with legal experts to compile and publish legislative histories on major public laws in-house. Over the past year…

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Breaking Down This Year’s Substantial Addition of Legislative Histories

Exploring HeinOnline, HeinOnline Updates, U.S. Federal Legislative History, What's New
Tara Kibler

Alongside the rest of our daily, weekly, and monthly content additions this year, we continued to expand the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library with additional statute coverage.

In total, 91 legislative histories were added to the database over the past 12 months, spanning more than 230,000 pages and covering a range of topics, from energy research and development to the president’s national emergency powers to music copyright in the streaming era.

About the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library

The U.S. Federal Legislative History Library contains thousands of titles from a number of sources, including the Government Printing Office, Arnold and Porter…

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Tip of the Week: How to Locate the Text of a Public Law

Searching, Sources of Compiled Legislative Histories, Statutes at Large, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Have you ever tried to locate the text of a public law or an Act, but didn’t have a U.S. Statutes at Large citation or a public law number handy? This week’s tip will showcase how to utilize three different sources in HeinOnline to locate the text of a public law using its popular name.

Watch the video below or continue reading below for the full-text version of our tip of the week.

U.S. Statutes at Large

The U.S. Statutes at Large is the official source for all laws and resolutions enacted by Congress…

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Unpacking the History of American and International Child Rights

Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Session Laws, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court, United Nations, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

What is a child? It may seem like a silly question, but the answer is more nuanced than one might think. In biology, the term refers to the state of the human being between birth and puberty. Legally, it refers to a person younger than a predetermined age of majority—the point in time when a person can take legal control over their actions and decisions. Symbolically, children have become much more. Over the past several hundred years, the child has become not only an allegory for innocence and the embodiment of freedom, but also a shining beacon of hope for future generations widely considered in need of adult protection.

Pre-20th Century Children

Though this view of the child is one we’re all familiar with now…

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A Quick ‘N Easy Guide to FDR’s Most Influential New Deal Programs

American History, Economics, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

The late 1920s and the 1930s witnessed the longest and most severe economic downturn the industrialized Western world had ever seen. Brought about by numerous factors—including a four-day stock market crash, banking panic and failures, and the use of the gold standard—the Great Depression caused a substantial decline in employment, wealth, output, gross domestic product (GDP), and more in numerous countries across the globe.

In the United States, recovery from the decade-long depression was primarily helmed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who pledged “a new deal for the American people” even before assuming the presidency. This promise soon became the namesake of a series of social programs, financial reforms, federal regulations…

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The Enron Corporation: A Tale of Corporate Fraud, Conspiracy, and Corruption

American History, Economics, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Eighteen years ago, the Enron Corporation filed for bankruptcy following one of the largest corporate scandals in American history. Among its devastating effects, Enron’s collapse left nearly 5,000 company employees without jobs, precipitated the dissolution of Arthur Andersen LLP (one of the five largest auditing and accounting companies in the world), and left a lasting impact on the financial and legal world.

Featured Databases

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases featured in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

1. U.S. Congressional Documents

Featuring the complete Congressional Record Bound version…

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Social Security Turns 84: A History of Roosevelt’s Landmark Act

American History, Economics, Highlights in History, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

You may have a Social Security number, but do you actually know why? On this day 84 years ago, the first act was signed to implement social security programs in the United States. Explore the origins of U.S. Social Security with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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One Small Step for Man, 50 Years of Innovation for Mankind

American History, Foreign Affairs, Highlights in History, Popular Culture, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library
Tara Kibler

Just 66 years after Orville and Wilbur Wright took mankind to the air, the United States put a man on the moon. Tomorrow, the fiftieth anniversary of that first moon landing will be commemorated across the United States. Most U.S. citizens can tell you that Neil Armstrong was the first man to step foot on the moon, but fewer may understand the journey it took to get there. Launch into a history of the Space Race and the evolution of the Apollo program with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post…

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Chernobyl: Not Just Another HBO Drama

Federal Register, Foreign Affairs, Highlights in History, Hot Topic News, Medicine, Popular Culture, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, The Environment, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Thanks to the wildly popular HBO miniseries on the subject, the Chernobyl nuclear explosion of 1986 has become a hot topic in the news. The Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, an area covering approximately 1,000 square miles around the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, has even become quite the tourist attraction. Journey with HeinOnline into the depths of the disaster, and learn a little more about nuclear energy in the U.S. while you’re at it.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today…

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