From Poppies to Painkillers: An Overview of the U.S. Opioid Crisis

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Current Events, Federal Register, GAO Reports and Comptroller General Decisions, Hot Topic News, Law, Medicine, Political Science, Reports of U.S. Presidential Commissions, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

It has recently been determined that drug overdoses are now the leading cause of death among Americans under 50 years of age. This finding is just one effect (among many) of the rising U.S. opioid crisis which, as of 2018, has been declared a national public health emergency by the Trump Administration and by the Department of Health and Human Services. With the opioid crisis rising once again to the forefront of U.S. news given the recent Johnson & Johnson opioid lawsuit, learn about the context of the epidemic and recent U.S. countermeasures with HeinOnline.

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You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

American History, Highlights in History, Human Rights, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Law, Political Science, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

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Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

American History, Current Events, Highlights in History, Hot Topic News, Human Rights, Law, LGBTQ, Popular Culture, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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New Legislative Histories Now Available!

HeinOnline Updates, U.S. Federal Legislative History, What's New
Lauren Mattiuzzo

HeinOnline’s U.S. Federal Legislative History Library includes comprehensive federal legislative histories published by the U.S. Government Publishing Office as well as private publishers. Users can research legislative intent behind major public laws and follow the progression of a bill from its introduction to its passage. We recently added two new legislative histories to this database, and we want to make sure you didn’t miss them! See what’s new in today’s blog.

FOIA Oversight and Implementation Act of 2016

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NEW Print Edition of Sources of Compiled Legislative Histories is now available!

Content News, HeinOnline Updates, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

It has been four years since a new edition was published for this essential tool used for legislative history research! Sources of Compiled Legislative Histories: A Bibliography of Government Documents, Periodical Articles, and Books, 1st Congress–114th Congress, Fourth Edition was compiled by new editors and includes more than 3,300 laws and nearly 7,800 bibliographic records! This book is easy to use and is perfect for librarians, attorneys, government employees, students, and researchers.

About The New Edition

A legislative history is the collection of documents produced in Congress during the enactment of a law…

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Legislative Intent and Statutory Interpretation

Exploring HeinOnline, Law, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Lauren Mattiuzzo

In cases that involve a statute, there is often a need for statutory interpretation. Some statutes can have straightforward meanings, while others can be ambiguous. In cases where a statute may be vague, judges must step in to decipher the legislative intent.

Statutory Interpretation

The language is the most important part of a statute. If the language itself is straightforward and plain, it must be applied according to its terms. However, if a statute is unclear, the interpretative process begins. Read about this process in the CRS Report…

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Food and Drug Law

Food and Drug Law, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Benjamin Boron

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Civilization has long been concerned with the quality and safety of foods and medicines. Up until the late 20th century, there were few laws regulating the ingredients of food products or the misrepresentation of medicinal substances.

On June 30, 1906, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act which was signed by President Theodore Roosevelt and was a key piece of Progressive Era legislation. This was the first of a series of significant consumer protection laws enacted by Congress in the 20th century that eventually led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

The Food and Drug Administration is a federal agency of the United States and is responsible for protecting and promoting public health by ensuring the safety…

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Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

Yesterday, the United States observed the holiday which marks Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.

Did you know?

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia with the original birth name of Michael King. His father was also named Michael King and later changed both his own and his son's name after a trip to Germany. The name Martin Luther was chosen in honor of the German religious reformer from the 1500s.

About Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.  He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights through nonviolent disobedience and for protesting racial discrimination in federal and state laws…

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Fact-Check to Avoid Spreading Fake News

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Furtak

Fake News: Then and Now

In 1938, Orson Welles directed and narrated an episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air that allegedly resulted in mass panic, as many listeners mistakenly thought the episode was a legitimate news broadcast. Titled "The War of the Worlds," the broadcast was composed of a series of simulated news bulletins about an alien invasion. It is hypothesized that people who tuned into the broadcast after its introduction, in which it was stated that program was a fictitious drama, believed the broadcast to be actual news, leading to phone calls to the radio station and panic. The degree to which the panic was widespread may have been overstated and is now a topic of debate among historians. 

Nearly 80 years later…

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Mandatory Overtime Pay

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Exploring HeinOnline, FAQ, Federal Register, Government Documents, Hein Blog, Navigating, ScholarCheck, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

On November 22, 2016, U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant III issued a preliminary injunction denying the U.S. Department of Labor's new regulation to extend mandatory overtime pay. Under the  regulation, workers who earn less than $47,476 per year and work more than 40 hours per week would have received mandatory overtime pay beginning December 1, 2016.

The Department of Labor's new guidelines applied to an estimated 4.2 million workers and would have doubled the maximum salary workers were allowed to earn and still be eligible for overtime pay, previously updated in 2004.

In anticipation of the December 1st deadline, many businesses have already increased salaries for employees who fall into this category in order to avoid paying the mandatory overtime…

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