The Life and Career of Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black

American History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Pentagon Papers, Statutes at Large, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Eighty-two years ago, Hugo Lafayette Black was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. The fifth-longest serving justice, an avid New Deal supporter, and a former Ku Klux Klansman, Hugo Black proved to be controversial yet influential in the outcome of landmark Supreme Court decisions. Read about Justice Black’s jurisprudence and Supreme Court career with HeinOnline.

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Coming for Katy Like a Dark Horse: Copyright Law in the U.S.

Current Events, Hot Topic News, Intellectual Property Law Collection, Law, Popular Culture, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

World-renowned pop singer Katy Perry was recently dealt a crushing blow when a jury found that her song “Dark Horse” had copied the work of gospel rapper Marcus Gray. The infringed song, “Joyful Noise,” was said to have an identical beat to “Dark Horse” in terms of length, rhythm, and pitch.

Several points were made in defense of Perry and her co-writers:

  • Perry’s attorneys argued that “each of the purported similarities between the works are commonplace.”
  • Music experts offered two compositions with a similar melody that predate “Joyful Noise.”
  • Perry and her colleagues testified that they had never heard of the song or its creator…

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Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Exploring Emojis and the Law

Fastcase, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Law, Law Journal Library, Popular Culture, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Did you know that today is World Emoji Day? In recent years, emojis have evolved into an essential tool for expressing emotions and ideas, becoming nearly equivalent to words themselves. As of 2015, 92% of people use emojis in their online communications. Just check out this Emoji Tracker to view the realtime usage of emojis on Twitter. Furthermore, Oxford University Press named an emoji as its 2015 “Word of the Year.” Emojis are so popular that there was even a terrible movie made about them.

As true components of contemporary language, it’s no wonder that emojis are increasingly submitted as evidence in court cases all over the United States…

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You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

American History, Highlights in History, Human Rights, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Law, Political Science, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

American History, Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Human Rights, Law, Popular Culture, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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The Right to Remain Silent: 53 Years of Miranda Rights

American History, Criminal Justice, Current Events, Highlights in History, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Fifty-three years ago today, the landmark decision of Miranda v. Arizona significantly impacted law enforcement procedure, establishing that criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before being taken into police custody. The ruling held that if defendants are not informed of their right to remain silent and consult with an attorney, statements made while in police custody cannot be admissible as evidence.

Though the language may vary between jurisdictions, the “Miranda warning” has become so ingrained in U.S. society due to its portrayal in film and television that many can recite the common phrasing offhand. Lesser known, perhaps, are the details about the case that started it all…

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“Heartbeat Bills” and the Push to Overturn Roe v. Wade

American History, Current Events, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Medicine, U.S. Supreme Court, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Last week, the Alabama legislature passed the most restrictive abortion bill in the United States, which Republican Governor Kay Ivey signed into law. The bill would make it a felony for the doctors to perform or attempt to perform an abortion in the state (although the woman who receives an abortion would not be held criminally culpable or civilly liable). Other states, such as Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Ohio, have passed “heartbeat bills,” which prohibit abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, which is typically when a doctor can first detect a fetal heartbeat. These laws will likely be appealed, as many violate the undue burden notion of established federal law…

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Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

American History, Current Events, Education, Highlights in History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, Session Laws, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

May 17, 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case, and then check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S. education.

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Class is Now in Session: Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Week

American History, Current Events, Education, Holidays and Observances, Law Journal Library, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

HeinOnline is honoring educators of all kinds for Teacher Appreciation Week (May 5-11 2019). We thank those teachers who furthered our own development, as well as those who are currently guiding future generations. Celebrate Teachers’ Week by setting aside those lesson plans and exploring the growth of education in the United States.

Revisiting U.S. Education with HeinOnline


The United States system of education has evolved under a variety of influences dating back to the Colonial Era.

17th-18th Centuries

Compulsory education is rooted in the ideals of the Thirteen Colonies…

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Most-Cited U.S. Supreme Court Cases in HeinOnline: Part III

Exploring HeinOnline, Law, ScholarCheck, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Almost ten years ago, we blogged about how we applied scholarly indexing to the U.S. Supreme Court Library. Then, a few months later we announced that we added links for users to access the articles which cite cases in HeinOnline, otherwise known as Hein’s ScholarCheck. Check out this snippet of our old interface from 2008!

What’s new since our last two blog posts? We have drastically updated our interface, and not only can users access articles which cite a case, but they can also access cases which cite a case! Fast forward nearly ten years, and let’s now take a look at the top 50 most-cited U.S…

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