You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

Highlights in History, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Hutchinson

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Hutchinson

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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The Right to Remain Silent: 53 Years of Miranda Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Fifty-three years ago today, the landmark decision of Miranda v. Arizona significantly impacted law enforcement procedure, establishing that criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before being taken into police custody. The ruling held that if defendants are not informed of their right to remain silent and consult with an attorney, statements made while in police custody cannot be admissible as evidence.

Though the language may vary between jurisdictions, the “Miranda warning” has become so ingrained in U.S. society due to its portrayal in film and television that many can recite the common phrasing offhand. Lesser known, perhaps, are the details about the case that started it all…

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“Heartbeat Bills” and the Push to Overturn Roe v. Wade

Current Events, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, Women and the Law
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Last week, the Alabama legislature passed the most restrictive abortion bill in the United States, which Republican Governor Kay Ivey signed into law. The bill would make it a felony for the doctors to perform or attempt to perform an abortion in the state (although the woman who receives an abortion would not be held criminally culpable or civilly liable). Other states, such as Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Ohio, have passed “heartbeat bills,” which prohibit abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, which is typically when a doctor can first detect a fetal heartbeat. These laws will likely be appealed, as many violate the undue burden notion of established federal law…

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Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Current Events, Highlights in History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Session Laws, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

May 17, 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case, and then check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S. education.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

Read More

Class is Now in Session: Celebrating Teacher Appreciation Week

Current Events, Holidays and Observances, Law Journal Library, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Hutchinson

HeinOnline is honoring educators of all kinds for Teacher Appreciation Week (May 5-11 2019). We thank those teachers who furthered our own development, as well as those who are currently guiding future generations. Celebrate Teachers’ Week by setting aside those lesson plans and exploring the growth of education in the United States.

Revisiting U.S. Education with HeinOnline


The United States system of education has evolved under a variety of influences dating back to the Colonial Era.

17th-18th Centuries

Compulsory education is rooted in the ideals of the Thirteen Colonies…

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Most-Cited U.S. Supreme Court Cases in HeinOnline: Part III

Exploring HeinOnline, ScholarCheck, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Almost ten years ago, we blogged about how we applied scholarly indexing to the U.S. Supreme Court Library. Then, a few months later we announced that we added links for users to access the articles which cite cases in HeinOnline, otherwise known as Hein’s ScholarCheck. Check out this snippet of our old interface from 2008!

What’s new since our last two blog posts? We have drastically updated our interface, and not only can users access articles which cite a case, but they can also access cases which cite a case! Fast forward nearly ten years, and let’s now take a look at the top 50 most-cited U.S…

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Research Spotlight: Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Earl Warren

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

The month of March marks the birthdays of former Chief Justice Earl Warren and retired Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor of the Supreme Court of the United States, both of whom substantially impacted the United States Supreme Court and the American legal system.

Retired Associate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor

Born on March 26, 1930 in El Paso, Texas, Sandra Day O’Connor spent much of her childhood on her family’s ranch in Arizona. She would grow up to be a pioneer for women, eventually serving as the first female Justice on the United States Supreme Court, for which she was unanimously approved by the Senate. While she is best known for this historical role…

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U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch

Author Profile Pages, Case Law, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Hein Blog, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

neilgorsuchsupremecourtnominee

On January 31, 2017 Judge Neil Gorsuch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit was officially nominated by President Donald J. Trump to fill the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy.  The vacancy was created by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia last year on February 13, 2016.

Born in Denver, Colorado, he moved to Washington, D.C. when his mother, Anne Gorsuch Burford, was appointed as the first female head of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. He went on to graduate from Columbia University with honors and earn his Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School, where he received a Truman Scholarship. As a Marshall Scholar…

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Happy Birthday Alexander Hamilton & Salmon P. Chase

Case Law, Exploring HeinOnline, Hein Blog, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

Beginning this year, we will be discussing notable figures in legal history and what information can be found on them in HeinOnline.  Last week marked the birthdays of Alexander Hamilton and Salmon P. Chase, both of whom greatly influenced the national banking system of the United States.

Alexander Hamilton (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873)

Over the past 2 years, much of America has heard of the revolutionary, hip-hop musical new to Broadway, Hamilton. With continued sold out performances on Broadway along with a national tour in 2017, this cultural phenomenon is far from over; even President Obama joined the Hamilton bandwagon.

Let’s not forget that the show is based upon one of our Founding Fathers…

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