Building America: The Powerful Story Behind “We the People”

Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

The Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America, the basis for the structure of the U.S. government, and the primary source for all legislative, executive, and judicial authority. Signed on September 17, 1787, the document became the first permanent constitution of its kind. The signing of the U.S. Constitution is commemorated with Constitution Day celebrations on September 17 of each year.

Originally consisting of seven articles, the Constitution outlined the framework for the newly established American government. As America has expanded over the past 232 years, the document has been amended to address the nation’s evolving needs. Join HeinOnline as we research the story behind the drafting…

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Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The United States Is No Longer Yours

Highlights in History, Treaties and Agreements Library, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

The Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 as a peace agreement between Great Britain and the United States of America to formally end the American Revolutionary War. Learn more about the evolution of the treaty with primary sources in HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

The Treaty of Paris


HISTORY OF THE TREATY

The American Revolutionary War began in 1775 when tensions increased between Great Britain and its thirteen colonies in North America…

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The Life and Career of Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black

History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Pentagon Papers, Statutes at Large, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Eighty-two years ago, Hugo Lafayette Black was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. The fifth-longest serving justice, an avid New Deal supporter, and a former Ku Klux Klansman, Hugo Black proved to be controversial yet influential in the outcome of landmark Supreme Court decisions. Read about Justice Black’s jurisprudence and Supreme Court career with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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Coming for Katy Like a Dark Horse: Copyright Law in the U.S.

Current Events, Hot Topic News, Intellectual Property Law Collection, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

World-renowned pop singer Katy Perry was recently dealt a crushing blow when a jury found that her song “Dark Horse” had copied the work of gospel rapper Marcus Gray. The infringed song, “Joyful Noise,” was said to have an identical beat to “Dark Horse” in terms of length, rhythm, and pitch.

Several points were made in defense of Perry and her co-writers:

  • Perry’s attorneys argued that “each of the purported similarities between the works are commonplace.”
  • Music experts offered two compositions with a similar melody that predate “Joyful Noise.”
  • Perry and her colleagues testified that they had never heard of the song or its creator…

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HeinOnline’s World Constitutions Illustrated: August 2019 Update

Content News, What's New, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Back in April, we updated our users on the content that was released in the World Constitutions Illustrated database dating back to January 2019. Read below to find out what documents have been added to this ever-growing database.

Updates from April to Date

Since our last content news update, we have updated 21 countries and added nearly 90 new titles to the World Constitutions Illustrated database.

We will continue to post constitutional content news right here in the HeinOnline blog…

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Juneteenth Day: Celebrating an End to Slavery in the United States

Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Slavery in America and the World, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Today, people across the United States are commemorating the end to American slavery. Juneteenth Day—a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth”—is the oldest known celebration of African-American emancipation. Though truly the date of slavery’s end in Texas, the holiday has been generalized throughout the United States to honor the end of slavery in general. Recognized by 45 states as a special day of observance, Juneteenth is celebrated with readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, the singing of traditional songs, cookouts, historical reenactments, fairs, parties, and more.

Celebrate this turning point in U.S. history by exploring HeinOnline’s completely free Slavery in America and the World: History…

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The Right to Remain Silent: 53 Years of Miranda Rights

Current Events, Highlights in History, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

Fifty-three years ago today, the landmark decision of Miranda v. Arizona significantly impacted law enforcement procedure, establishing that criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before being taken into police custody. The ruling held that if defendants are not informed of their right to remain silent and consult with an attorney, statements made while in police custody cannot be admissible as evidence.

Though the language may vary between jurisdictions, the “Miranda warning” has become so ingrained in U.S. society due to its portrayal in film and television that many can recite the common phrasing offhand. Lesser known, perhaps, are the details about the case that started it all…

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Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Current Events, Highlights in History, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, Session Laws, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Hutchinson

May 17, 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case, and then check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S. education.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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HeinOnline’s World Constitutions Illustrated: April 2019 Update

Content News, What's New, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Back in January, we updated our users on the content that was released in the World Constitutions Illustrated database dating back to September 2018. Read below to find out what documents have been added to this ever-growing database.

Updates from January to Date

Since our last content news update, we have updated 18 countries and added more than 100 new titles to the World Constitutions Illustrated database.

We will continue to post constitutional content news right here in the HeinOnline blog. Be sure to subscribe to our blog to receive notifications when new posts are published…

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HeinOnline’s World Constitutions Illustrated: January 2019 Update

Content News, What's New, World Constitutions Illustrated
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Back in September, we updated our users on the content that was released in the World Constitutions Illustrated database dating back to May. Read below to find out what documents have been added to this ever-growing database.

Updates from September 2018 to Date

Since the last content news update, we have updated 17 countries and added nearly 170 new titles to the World Constitutions Illustrated database.

We will continue to post constitutional content news right here in the HeinOnline blog. Be sure to subscribe to our blog to receive notifications when new posts are published…

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