Tag: u.s. supreme court library

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Education & Empowerment: The History of HBCUs

Prior to the Civil War, African Americans weren’t allowed to receive an education. The Emancipation Proclamation may have freed the enslaved according to legislation, but truly, African Americans couldn’t achieve equality without education. And that’s where HBCUs came into play.

image of doctor preparing a vaccination

Mandates to Vaccinate: A Brief History

Vaccination requirements aren’t new in the United States. Many infectious diseases have resulted in mandatory inoculations at the federal and state level—well before today’s health and safety measures were put into place.

Burning book

Banned Books Week: Protecting the Right to Read

This week marks Banned Books Week, celebrated annually at the end of September to honor our freedom to read and the importance of free access to information, whether or not we personally agree with it. Join us as we explore the history of banned books.

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Roe v. Wade Threatened in Supreme Court Shadow Docket Ruling

In a 5-4 ruling, the Supreme Court of the United States issued a shadow docket refusing to block a Texas law banning abortion after six weeks. This new law violates the 1973 landmark decision Roe v. Wade, which declared a pregnant person has a constitutional right to an abortion.

Sonia Sotomayor photo

All About Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Sotomayor is known as the first woman of color, first Hispanic, and first Latina member of the Supreme Court of the United States. In this blog, we’ll explore Sotomayor’s education, early legal career, and notable rulings.

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8 Forgotten Stories from American History

American history is brimming with lesser-known—but still fascinating—phenomena that even the most diligent historian may have forgotten. Read to explore a few of these stories with HeinOnline.

White puzzle pieces with one piece missing

Crime of the Century: The Kidnapping of Peter Weinberger

In 1956, Betty Weinberger sat on the patio with her one-month-old son, Peter. She briefly stepped inside the house, but when she returned just a few minutes later, Peter was gone. Read up on this crime of the century and others, as well as kidnapping-related legislation.

Supreme Court building

All About President Biden’s New Supreme Court Commission

President Joe Biden recently issued an executive order creating a bipartisan commission of 36 experts to study structural changes to the Supreme Court. View this executive order in the Federal Register within HeinOnline to learn more about these changes.