National Survey of State Laws: NEW Update Now Available

National Survey of State Laws, What's New
Shannon Sabo

Comparing laws among states has never been easier!

Last year, HeinOnline teamed up with Rich Leiter, Director of the Schmid Law Library and Professor of Law at the University of Nebraska College of Law, to create a database version of National Survey of State Laws. This easy-to-use resource provides an overall view of the most sought-after and controversial legal topics in the United States and enables users to make basic state-by-state comparisons of current state laws.

Summary of Winter 2017 Updates
by Rich Leiter

The Winter 2017 release includes several important updates, some of which come as the result of the November 2016 election…

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NOW AVAILABLE! Multinational Sources Compared: A Subject and Jurisdiction Index

Multinational Sources Compared, What's New
Shannon Sabo

A unique finding aid designed to direct researchers to sources that compare multiple jurisdictions on focused subjects is now available in both print and database formats, exclusively in HeinOnline.

Multinational Sources Compared: A Subject and Jurisdiction Index by Alena L. Wolotira and Sherry L. Leysen is an impressive collection of detailed bibliographic records and is based on Professor Jon Schultz’s Statutes Compared: A U.S., Canadian, Multinational Research Guide to Statutes by Subject (2nd edition, 2001) and Multinational Statutes Compared: A Research Guide to Statutes by Subject (2003). These publications gave extensive reviews of each selected resource in order to give researchers an idea of what the resource contained before trying to obtain it…

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Michael Flynn and The Logan Act

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Government Documents
Bonnie Hein

After less than one month of service, retired U.S. Army lieutenant general Michael T. Flynn resigned as United States national security advisor on February 13, 2017 after a controversy arose about his prior conversations with Sergey Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to the United States.

Leading up to Flynn’s official resignation were allegations of inappropriate telephone discussions with Kislyak regarding the Obama administration’s expulsion of Russian diplomats and sanctions against Russia during the transition period prior to the inauguration of President Trump. He  subsequently misled Vice President Pence regarding these conversations.

Press coverage about the phone calls and presidential transition discussed the possibility of Mike Flynn potentially being subject to further punishment other than his resigning…

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New HeinOnline Knowledge Base

Enhancements, Functionality, HeinOnline Support, Training, What's New
Bonnie Hein

We have been diligently working to develop our new HeinOnline Knowledge Base and are excited to announce that it is now available!

Click the Help drop-down menu located in the top right corner of any page in HeinOnline to select the new Knowledge Base, which is also available at help.heinonline.org:

The Knowledge Base is now full-text searchable, and each article is categorized for easy browsing. Six popular categories appear on the Knowledge Base homepage, and others are accessible by clicking them from within search results:

As you enter your search terms, results will auto-fill as you type…

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Women’s History Month

Current Events, Searching, Women and the Law
Bonnie Hein

Origins of Women’s History Month

Originally, Women’s History Week was designated the week beginning March 7, 1982 under Public Law 97-28 (95 Stat. 148) and announced with Presidential Proclamation 4903 by President Ronald Reagan:

“American women of every race, creed and ethnic background helped found and build our Nation in countless recorded and unrecorded ways. As pioneers, teachers, mothers, homemakers, soldiers, nurses and laborers, women played and continue to play a vital role in American economic, cultural and social life. In science, business, medicine, law, the arts and the home, women have made significant contributions to the growth and development of our land. Their diverse service is among America’s most precious gifts….”

After being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project…

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New Off-Campus Access Login

Access, Enhancements, Hein Blog, HeinOnline, Libraries, Library Corner
Bonnie Hein

HeinOnline is pleased to announce our new off-campus access login option on our welcome page.

In a mission to make HeinOnline easily accessible for students and faculty, we are now offering a menu on our login page where users may select their college or university, which will then direct them to the proxy login area for HeinOnline.

How to access:

In order to access your institution’s proxy login page, simply type the name of the institution.  You will note the institution names begin to autofill as you type:

offcampusloginblog

You may then select the institution and click login, which will direct you to the proxy login area for HeinOnline…

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HeinOnline: The Most Reliable Source for Government Documents

Government Documents
Shannon Sabo

govdocim

HeinOnline has long been known as the most comprehensive source of law and law-related journals, but it's much more than the best place to find articles. HeinOnline contains more than 140,000 titles and nearly 145,000,000 pages, as well as comprehensive coverage of documents from both the U.S. federal government and state session laws. HeinOnline's government document content is easy to browse and search and, in many cases, covers material far beyond the range available other commercial publisher or even government websites. Because HeinOnline is composed of image-based, fully searchable PDFs, the authenticity of these documents is never in question as they are all exact replicas of the official print publications.

Government Document Databases in HeinOnline

U.S…

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Linking to the GPO's High Resolution Color PDFs of the Federal Register Is Now Available!

Content News, Federal Register, Government Documents
Benjamin Boron

pexels-photo-41056

The Federal Register is a primary source for United States federal government agencies’ proposed rules, final rules, changes to existing rules and notices, as well as executive orders and other presidential documents. The Federal Register is the official journal of record for the acts of the U.S. Government. It's updated daily and printed Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. This publication is divided into four categories: 

  • Presidential documents, executive orders, and proclamations
  • Rules and Regulations (policy statements and interpretations of rules by federal agencies)
  • Proposed Rules (petitions by agencies for assistance in rulemaking and other proposals)
  • Notices (scheduled hearings and meetings open to the public…

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Food and Drug Law

Food and Drug Law, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Benjamin Boron

Tags:

fruit-food-healthy-fresh-53130

Civilization has long been concerned with the quality and safety of foods and medicines. Up until the late 20th century, there were few laws regulating the ingredients of food products or the misrepresentation of medicinal substances.

On June 30, 1906, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act which was signed by President Theodore Roosevelt and was a key piece of Progressive Era legislation. This was the first of a series of significant consumer protection laws enacted by Congress in the 20th century that eventually led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

The Food and Drug Administration is a federal agency of the United States and is responsible for protecting and promoting public health by ensuring the safety…

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Celebrating Presidents' Day with Abraham Lincoln and George Washington

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

presidentsday

Washington's Birthday or Presidents' Day?

The American holiday of Presidents' Day was originally established in 1885 in recognition of the first President of the United States, George Washington. It was officially called Washington's Birthday and observed as a federal holiday on February 22nd, Washington's actual day of birth. Washington's Birthday was the first federal holiday celebrating the life of an individual American, joining only four national bank holidays – Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving.

It became popularly known as Presidents' Day after it was moved by the 1971 Uniform Monday Holiday Act (82 Stat. 250) in order to create more three day weekends for American workers and increase retail and tourism revenue

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