Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

Yesterday, the United States observed the holiday which marks Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.

Did you know?

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia with the original birth name of Michael King. His father was also named Michael King and later changed both his own and his son's name after a trip to Germany. The name Martin Luther was chosen in honor of the German religious reformer from the 1500s.

About Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.  He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights through nonviolent disobedience and for protesting racial discrimination in federal and state laws…

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HEINONLINE WORLD CONSTITUTIONS ILLUSTRATED: DECEMBER UPDATE

HeinOnline, World Constitutions Illustrated
Kaylyn Zurawski

With the December release, 62 new documents and 25 new titles have been added to World Constitutions Illustrated; see below for details.

Albania

  • In September we included the text of the Constitution of 1998 as amended on 22 July 2016. Also included is the English translation from the Venice Commission

 

Austria

  • We included 14 Constitutional Laws dating from 1862 to 2013 (all currently in force) in diglot German/English editions of the Federal Chancellery

 

Azerbaijan

  • The Constitution of 1995 was further amended by the Referendum of 26 September 2016. The Constitutional Court has now provided the Azerbaijani and Russian texts…

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Fact-Check to Avoid Spreading Fake News

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

Fake News: Then and Now

In 1938, Orson Welles directed and narrated an episode of The Mercury Theatre on the Air that allegedly resulted in mass panic, as many listeners mistakenly thought the episode was a legitimate news broadcast. Titled "The War of the Worlds," the broadcast was composed of a series of simulated news bulletins about an alien invasion. It is hypothesized that people who tuned into the broadcast after its introduction, in which it was stated that program was a fictitious drama, believed the broadcast to be actual news, leading to phone calls to the radio station and panic. The degree to which the panic was widespread may have been overstated and is now a topic of debate among historians. 

Nearly 80 years later…

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2016 Year in Review

Author Profile Pages, Buddhism, Content News, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, National Survey of State Laws, Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases, Slavery in America and the World, UNC Press, What's New
Shannon Sabo

What a tumultuous year 2016 turned out to be! Brexit and the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States surprised the world; many entertainment icons passed away, including actor Gene Wilder, actress Florence Henderson, singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen, legendary musician and performer Prince, and psychic Miss Cleo, among many others. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia also died suddenly, leaving a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court that has yet to be filled…

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Research Strange Events in American History

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, U.S. Congressional Documents
Shannon Sabo

On June 4, 1947, the first high altitude data gathering balloon was launched from the Alamogordo Army Airfield in New Mexico. Officials later determined that remnants of this balloon were discovered on a ranch near Roswell, New Mexico, prompting the start of what would later become known as the "Roswell Incident." This area still carries an air of mystery, possibly due to an extremely popular feature film directed by Steven Spielberg called Close Encounters of the Third Kindwhich dealt with UFOs and alien life forms.

Brief Timeline of Events
  • June 14, 1947: Foreman William Brazel notices debris at his place of employment, a ranch near Roswell…

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Don't Get Denied: Make Sure Your Current Information Is On File With Us!

Exploring HeinOnline, Technical Support
Shannon Sabo

Stay Connected: Update IP Addresses and Ranges

Each day, hundreds of IP addresses try to access HeinOnline but are rejected because those addresses are not authenticated to the database. Surprisingly, the HeinOnline development team started finding that some of these addresses belong to universities and law firms who already subscribe! Most subscribers have organization-wide access, so make sure IP information from all areas has been provided to us.

The start of a new year is the perfect time to do some housekeeping. Check in with your organization's information technology team to determine if any IP addresses may have changed, or if new addresses or ranges may have been added. Then, email updated IP information to techsupport@wshein.com so we can verify that we have the most current information on file…

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HEINONLINE WORLD CONSTITUTIONS ILLUSTRATED: NOVEMBER UPDATE

HeinOnline, World Constitutions Illustrated
Kaylyn Zurawski

With the November release, 73 new documents and 28 new titles have been added to World Constitutions Illustrated; see below for details.

Algeria

  • We add our own translation of the current/original text of the Constitution of 1989. This document was significantly amended in 1996 and again in 2016.

 

Bangladesh

  • We include the current/latest English text of the Constitution of 1972 as amended by the Sixteenth Amendment Act of 2014.

 

Brazil

  • Last month we published the Portuguese texts of the 93rd Amendment and the Transitional Constitutional Provisions Act (ADCT). Prof Keith Rosenn has now updated his translation of the ADCT…

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Mandatory Overtime Pay

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Exploring HeinOnline, FAQ, Federal Register, Government Documents, Hein Blog, Navigating, ScholarCheck, Searching, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Bonnie Hein

On November 22, 2016, U.S. District Judge Amos Mazzant III issued a preliminary injunction denying the U.S. Department of Labor's new regulation to extend mandatory overtime pay. Under the  regulation, workers who earn less than $47,476 per year and work more than 40 hours per week would have received mandatory overtime pay beginning December 1, 2016.

The Department of Labor's new guidelines applied to an estimated 4.2 million workers and would have doubled the maximum salary workers were allowed to earn and still be eligible for overtime pay, previously updated in 2004.

In anticipation of the December 1st deadline, many businesses have already increased salaries for employees who fall into this category in order to avoid paying the mandatory overtime…

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2

Dakota Access Pipeline Project: Good or Bad?

American Indian, Case Law, Citations, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Hein Blog, U.S. Supreme Court, World Treaty Library
Bonnie Hein

On Monday, the Department of the Army announced their denial of the final easement of the Dakota Access Pipeline project under Lake Oahe, stating: "The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing."  To the protestors recently numbering more than 2,000, this decision is a great victory at the Standing Rock site; however, their fight may be far from over.

The announcement comes after months of litigation, protests, and at times violence, over the completion of the DAPL project.  On the recent Sunday evening of November 20th, 400 protesters collided with police, leading to the hospitalization of many protesters…

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Two New Titles Added To the U.S. Federal Legislative History Library

Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Shannon Sabo

HeinOnline's U.S. Federal Legislative History Library is a research powerhouse containing more than 2,400 titles and covering all major public laws. Documents contained in legislative histories include various bill versions, House reports, Senate reports, congressional hearings, the full text of the final public law, and more. Researchers use these documents to clarify ambiguous statutory language and to determine legislative intent behind all or portions of a public law.

This month, we've added two significant compiled legislative histories dealing with extremely relevant topics: cybersecurity and tax hikes. Both legislative histories were compiled by William H. Manz. Manz is an attorney and adjunct professor at St. John's University Law School in Jamaica, New York, where he previously held the position of Senior Research Librarian…

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