Women’s History Month

Current Events, Searching, Women and the Law
Bonnie Hein

Origins of Women’s History Month

Originally, Women’s History Week was designated the week beginning March 7, 1982 under Public Law 97-28 (95 Stat. 148) and announced with Presidential Proclamation 4903 by President Ronald Reagan:

“American women of every race, creed and ethnic background helped found and build our Nation in countless recorded and unrecorded ways. As pioneers, teachers, mothers, homemakers, soldiers, nurses and laborers, women played and continue to play a vital role in American economic, cultural and social life. In science, business, medicine, law, the arts and the home, women have made significant contributions to the growth and development of our land. Their diverse service is among America’s most precious gifts….”

After being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project…

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New Off-Campus Access Login

Access, Enhancements, Hein Blog, HeinOnline, Libraries, Library Corner
Bonnie Hein

HeinOnline is pleased to announce our new off-campus access login option on our welcome page.

In a mission to make HeinOnline easily accessible for students and faculty, we are now offering a menu on our login page where users may select their college or university, which will then direct them to the proxy login area for HeinOnline.

How to access:

In order to access your institution’s proxy login page, simply type the name of the institution.  You will note the institution names begin to autofill as you type:

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You may then select the institution and click login, which will direct you to the proxy login area for HeinOnline…

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HeinOnline: The Most Reliable Source for Government Documents

Government Documents
Shannon Sabo

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HeinOnline has long been known as the most comprehensive source of law and law-related journals, but it’s much more than the best place to find articles. HeinOnline contains more than 140,000 titles and nearly 145,000,000 pages, as well as comprehensive coverage of documents from both the U.S. federal government and state session laws. HeinOnline’s government document content is easy to browse and search and, in many cases, covers material far beyond the range available other commercial publisher or even government websites. Because HeinOnline is composed of image-based, fully searchable PDFs, the authenticity of these documents is never in question as they are all exact replicas of the official print publications.

Government Document Databases in HeinOnline

U.S…

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Linking to the GPO's High Resolution Color PDFs of the Federal Register Is Now Available!

Content News, Federal Register, Government Documents
Benjamin Boron

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The Federal Register is a primary source for United States federal government agencies’ proposed rules, final rules, changes to existing rules and notices, as well as executive orders and other presidential documents. The Federal Register is the official journal of record for the acts of the U.S. Government. It's updated daily and printed Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. This publication is divided into four categories: 

  • Presidential documents, executive orders, and proclamations
  • Rules and Regulations (policy statements and interpretations of rules by federal agencies)
  • Proposed Rules (petitions by agencies for assistance in rulemaking and other proposals)
  • Notices (scheduled hearings and meetings open to the public…

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Food and Drug Law

Food and Drug Law, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Federal Legislative History
Benjamin Boron

Tags:

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Civilization has long been concerned with the quality and safety of foods and medicines. Up until the late 20th century, there were few laws regulating the ingredients of food products or the misrepresentation of medicinal substances.

On June 30, 1906, Congress passed the Pure Food and Drug Act which was signed by President Theodore Roosevelt and was a key piece of Progressive Era legislation. This was the first of a series of significant consumer protection laws enacted by Congress in the 20th century that eventually led to the creation of the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

The Food and Drug Administration is a federal agency of the United States and is responsible for protecting and promoting public health by ensuring the safety…

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Celebrating Presidents' Day with Abraham Lincoln and George Washington

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, Slavery in America and the World, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Presidential Library
Bonnie Hein

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Washington's Birthday or Presidents' Day?

The American holiday of Presidents' Day was originally established in 1885 in recognition of the first President of the United States, George Washington. It was officially called Washington's Birthday and observed as a federal holiday on February 22nd, Washington's actual day of birth. Washington's Birthday was the first federal holiday celebrating the life of an individual American, joining only four national bank holidays – Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving.

It became popularly known as Presidents' Day after it was moved by the 1971 Uniform Monday Holiday Act (82 Stat. 250) in order to create more three day weekends for American workers and increase retail and tourism revenue

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Cataloging Legal Literature: New Update!

Cataloging Legal Literature, What's New
Melody Lembke

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Revision 1 to Cataloging Legal Literature 4 just issued!

<Sigh of relief, appropriate emoticon>. I managed to issue a “real” continuing resource this time, and not just a treatise in a binder that never got updated as with CLL3 in 1997. Kudos to co-author Melissa Beck and Hein’s Sheila Jarrett for keeping us on track! What happened during that big gap between CLL3 and CLL4? I wasn’t just twiddling my thumbs waiting around for AACR3 to appear; I was sitting at one sports field or another as my sons made it through school. For those of you that can remember me dragging babies to AALL meetings, here’s something to make you feel real “experienced.” My oldest is turning 30 this week…

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U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Neil Gorsuch

Author Profile Pages, Case Law, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, Hein Blog, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Bonnie Hein

neilgorsuchsupremecourtnominee

On January 31, 2017 Judge Neil Gorsuch of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit was officially nominated by President Donald J. Trump to fill the U.S. Supreme Court vacancy.  The vacancy was created by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia last year on February 13, 2016.

Born in Denver, Colorado, he moved to Washington, D.C. when his mother, Anne Gorsuch Burford, was appointed as the first female head of the United States Environmental Protection Agency. He went on to graduate from Columbia University with honors and earn his Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School, where he received a Truman Scholarship. As a Marshall Scholar…

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Research Trending Legal Topics in HeinOnline

Access, Exploring HeinOnline, FAQ, Hein Blog, ScholarCheck
Bonnie Hein

trendinglegaltopics

 

HeinOnline's ScholarCheck is a series of tools which help researchers locate and access related material  from inside HeinOnline and via Fastcase. ScholarCheck also keeps track of the number of times articles are cited by other articles and cases. One of the more recent metrics tracked by ScholarCheck is the number of times articles have been accessed within a rolling 12-month period by other HeinOnline users. The HeinOnline development team recently ran a report of the articles which had the greatest increase in the number of times accessed between January 2016 and now, and some trending topics are discussed below.

Peer-to-Peer Marketplace

Companies such as Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb continue to grow the peer-to-peer marketplace addressing ride-sharing…

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Black History Month and Race Relations in the United States

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Searching, U.S. Congressional Documents
admin

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Each February, Americans honor both people and significant events in African-American history during Black History Month, also known as African-American History Month.

Among the myriad reasons Black History Month is important is the underrepresentation of people of color in standard history classes. For instance, the recently released biographical drama Hidden Figures depicts the story of three female African-American mathematicians who worked at NASA and were integral in getting American astronauts into space. Their names are nowhere near as widely discussed as John Glenn or Neil Armstrong, though their contributions to the space program were arguably as important.

Because underrepresentation of African Americans in traditionally-taught history has long been a problem, Black History Week was created in 1926…

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