A Columbus Day Exploration of Indigenous American History

American History, American Indian, Holidays and Observances, Human Rights, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Political Science, Statutes at Large, World Constitutions Illustrated, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

On this day each October, we observe the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the Americas in 1492. However, the often-devastating impact of “Western” influences on indigenous Americans has led some to be wary of celebrating the man who started it all. As a solution, many have begun to counter-celebrate with “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” in honor of American Indian history and culture.

Regardless of your stance on Columbus Day, one thing is certain—albeit dark at times, American Indians have a rich and storied history which is forever entwined with the evolution of the United States. Join us as we explore that history with HeinOnline’s American Indian Law Collection and other relevant databases…

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The Nuremberg Trials and Their Profound Impact on International Law

Criminal Justice, Foreign Affairs, Highlights in History, Human Rights, International Law, Law, Law Journal Library, World Treaty Library
Tara Kibler

Seventy-three years ago today, the International Military Tribunal of the Nuremberg trials prosecuted the major parties responsible for the Holocaust and other World War II atrocities. The creation of the Nuremberg trials, their framework, and their outcomes were not only unprecedented but highly controversial. Learn about the trials and their impact with HeinOnline’s History of International Law database.

History of International Law*
Equipped with nearly 2,000 titles and more than 1.2 million pages of content dating back to 1690, History of International Law covers a variety of subjects such as war and peace, law of the sea, international arbitration, events at the Hague…

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Remix to Ignition, Heading Right Back to Prison: Sex Trafficking and the Law

Criminal Justice, Current Events, Hot Topic News, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Popular Culture, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, United Nations
Tara Kibler

Last month, billionaire Jeffrey Epstein was arrested on charges of sex trafficking girls as young as 14. In the same week, singer and record producer R. Kelly was also arrested for sex trafficking, production of child pornography, child sexual exploitation, kidnapping, and forced labor. In both cases, the arrests follow several years of allegations of sexual abuse against minors. As you await the outcome of both trials, study up on the charges by learning more about sex trafficking with HeinOnline.

Before We Get Started

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today…

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You Gotta Fight For Your Right To Equality: 55 Years of Civil Rights

American History, Highlights in History, Human Rights, John F. Kennedy Assassination Collection, Law, Political Science, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Agency Library, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

On this day 55 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 during the height of the civil rights movement. Originally proposed by President John F. Kennedy, the act prohibited discrimination, ended racial segregation, created equal employment opportunity, and more. Join HeinOnline as we explore the evolution of the act, the efforts that went into its passage, and its ultimate impact.

Before We Get Started:

Don’t miss out! Make sure you have the databases we’ll be mentioning in this post. Follow the links below to start a trial today.

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Pride and Prejudice: Researching Stonewall and LGBT Rights

American History, Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Hot Topic News, Human Rights, Law, Popular Culture, Statutes at Large, U.S. Federal Legislative History, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

Fifty years ago today, members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) community fought back against a police raid at the Stonewall Inn in New York City with violent demonstrations now known as the Stonewall Riots. Considered the first significant protest calling for equal rights for homosexuals, the Riots inspired future gay pride celebrations to be held annually in June. In 1999, June was officially declared “Gay and Lesbian Pride Month” by President Bill Clinton. Pride Month was later expanded to “LGBT Pride Month” by President Barack Obama in 2009.

The Stonewall Riots launched an international phenomenon that continues to grow as LGBT rights are increasingly recognized across the globe…

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Secrets of the Serial Set: Susan B. Anthony and Women’s Suffrage

American History, Exploring HeinOnline, Human Rights, Law, Secrets of the Serial Set, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, Women's Studies
Tara Kibler

This month, HeinOnline continues its Secrets of the Serial Set series with a consideration of Susan B. Anthony, her trial, and women’s suffrage in general.

Secrets of the Serial Set is a new monthly blog series from HeinOnline dedicated to unveiling the wealth of American history found in the United States Congressional Serial Set. Join us each month to explore notable events in U.S. history with the primary sources themselves. Prepare to be blown away by what the Serial Set has to offer.


ABOUT THE SERIAL SET

The United States Congressional Serial Set is considered an essential publication for studying American history…

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Juneteenth Day: Celebrating an End to Slavery in the United States

American History, Current Events, Highlights in History, Holidays and Observances, Human Rights, Law, Political Science, Slavery in America and the World, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Today, people across the United States are commemorating the end to American slavery. Juneteenth Day—a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth”—is the oldest known celebration of African-American emancipation. Though truly the date of slavery’s end in Texas, the holiday has been generalized throughout the United States to honor the end of slavery in general. Recognized by 45 states as a special day of observance, Juneteenth is celebrated with readings of the Emancipation Proclamation, the singing of traditional songs, cookouts, historical reenactments, fairs, parties, and more.

Celebrate this turning point in U.S. history by exploring HeinOnline’s completely free Slavery in America and the World: History…

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The Right to Remain Silent: 53 Years of Miranda Rights

American History, Criminal Justice, Current Events, Highlights in History, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

Fifty-three years ago today, the landmark decision of Miranda v. Arizona significantly impacted law enforcement procedure, establishing that criminal suspects must be advised of their rights before being taken into police custody. The ruling held that if defendants are not informed of their right to remain silent and consult with an attorney, statements made while in police custody cannot be admissible as evidence.

Though the language may vary between jurisdictions, the “Miranda warning” has become so ingrained in U.S. society due to its portrayal in film and television that many can recite the common phrasing offhand. Lesser known, perhaps, are the details about the case that started it all…

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U.S. Immigration Law and Policy: Past and Present

American History, Criminal Justice, Current Events, Foreign Affairs, Hot Topic News, Human Rights, Immigration, Law, Political Science
Tara Kibler

Immigration continues to be a hot and controversial topic in U.S. news, particularly throughout the current presidential administration. Luckily, HeinOnline has gathered the most important U.S. immigration legislation into one unique database to help users stay on top of developments in relevant law and policy.

Immigration Law & Policy in the U.S.

Since its release in April 2013, HeinOnline’s Immigration Law & Policy in the U.S. database has grown by more than 2,400 titles to include more than 3,000 volumes and 600,000 pages. The monumental collection is a compilation of the most important historical documents and legislation related to immigration in the United States…

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“Heartbeat Bills” and the Push to Overturn Roe v. Wade

American History, Current Events, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Human Rights, Law, Law Journal Library, Medicine, U.S. Supreme Court, Women and the Law, Women's Studies
Lauren Mattiuzzo

Last week, the Alabama legislature passed the most restrictive abortion bill in the United States, which Republican Governor Kay Ivey signed into law. The bill would make it a felony for the doctors to perform or attempt to perform an abortion in the state (although the woman who receives an abortion would not be held criminally culpable or civilly liable). Other states, such as Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, and Ohio, have passed “heartbeat bills,” which prohibit abortions after six weeks of pregnancy, which is typically when a doctor can first detect a fetal heartbeat. These laws will likely be appealed, as many violate the undue burden notion of established federal law…

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