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Poison on the Shelves: Federal Product Tampering Laws and the Chicago Tylenol Murders

Exploring HeinOnline, Federal Register, Food and Drug Law, Law Journal Library, Medicine, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents
Stephanie Ruesch

The holidays are fast approaching. Whether you’re gathering in-person with family or carving individual ham steaks over Zoom, preparations still need to be made, bringing along the usual hassle, chaos, and stress that come from trying to accommodate everyone’s schedules, prepare a meal, and decide whether it’s okay to mute Uncle Jim when he starts talking politics. All this family togetherness can bring on a headache, and you may reach for your trusty bottle of Holiday Acetaminophen™ to provide some relief. This relief is only obtainable after you rip off the plastic wrapper around the bottle’s neck, battle open the child-proof cap, peel off the inner foil safety seal, peel off the little bits of the seal you didn’t get off the first time…

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Marbury v. Madison: The Most Important Decision in American Constitutional Law

History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Statutes at Large, Treaties and Agreements Library, U.S. Presidential Library, U.S. Supreme Court, World Constitutions Illustrated
Tara Kibler

This past Tuesday, the Affordable Care Act returned to the Supreme Court for the third time. Opponents argue that the health insurance mandate included in the legislation is unconstitutional, and that the entire act should therefore be struck down.

You may be wondering, from where does the Supreme Court derive this power? To discover the answer, travel with HeinOnline back to the turn of the nineteenth century.

The Election of 1800

This story starts with a presidential election, which, we have to say, is a much more enjoyable phenomenon to look back on than to experience. The main candidates were incumbent President John Adams—a Federalist favoring strong central government—and Vice President Thomas Jefferson…

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Tip of the Week: How to Locate a Title in HeinOnline

Law Journal Library, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks
Lauren Mattiuzzo

When the phone rings here at HeinOnline, one of the most frequently asked questions is “How do I locate a title?” Whether users are trying to locate a publication title or an article title, we have tools to make document retrieval a breeze. Watch this quick tutorial on the various ways to pull up a title in HeinOnline, or read below for more information.

How to Locate a Publication Title

The Catalog tab, found in the stationary search bar…

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Tip of the Week: Researching the Career of a Senator

Exploring HeinOnline, Law Journal Library, Tip of the Week, Tips and Tricks, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set
Tara Kibler

The ability to thoroughly investigate and analyze the activity of Congress and its members is crucial for historical research projects, understanding current events, and these days, especially, for becoming a more informed voter during election time.

Discover a few ways to research the life and career of a U.S. senator, in particular, with this tip of the week. We’d like to thank Staci Green, Head of Library Operations at Dickinson State University, for her recent question, which inspired this blog post!

Start with the Basics

Before diving into the nitty gritty of database research, you’ll want to check and see if any relevant titles have already been compiled…

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New Journals Added to HeinOnline This Month!

Content News, HeinOnline Updates, Law Journal Library, Tips and Tricks, What's New
Tara Kibler

With the October content release, we added 10 new journals, all of which are active serials. Before we take a closer look at each of the new titles, we have a special announcement!

We are happy to report that due to an updated agreement with the publisher, HeinOnline now provides current content for the Journal of Space Law. Published by University of Mississippi School of Law since 1973, this widely recognized journal is devoted to space law and the legal problems arising out of human activities in outer space.


VIEW JOURNAL OF SPACE LAW


Now let’s dive into the new journals and see what content they cover…

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Where the Wild Things Are: Hunting Regulations

Exploring HeinOnline, Government Documents, Law Journal Library, Legal Classics, Statutes at Large, U.S. Congressional Documents, U.S. Congressional Serial Set, U.S. Presidential Library
Stephanie Ruesch

Fall’s arrival brings a chill to the air, changing colors to the leaves, and pumpkin spice flavoring to more products than necessary. But for many people, fall’s arrival also brings on an acute case of buck fever, alleviated only by long hours in a tree stand, or for others the urge to sit near the water in a duck blind with a bird call in hand, waiting for a fast-flying fowl. For these outdoorsmen and women, the change in weather means the start of the much-anticipated fall hunting season.

Hunting in America is primarily regulated at the state level, with additional regulations coming from federal laws that protect endangered species and migratory birds…

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Handling the Supreme Court Vacancy: Is Court Packing a Viable Option?

American History, Law, Law Journal Library, U.S. Supreme Court
Tara Kibler

In the wake of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, some Democrats have pushed the idea of expanding the number of justices on the Supreme Court. The concept—known as “court packing”—has caught fire in some circles, particularly following the announcement of President Trump’s official nominee pick, Amy Coney Barrett. A conservative-leaning circuit judge, Barrett’s confirmation would reshape the ideology of the Supreme Court and could hinder it from making more liberal decisions.

Why does the Supreme Court only have nine justices, anyway? What is court packing, really? Is it a feasible option for the Democrats? Why should we care? Allow HeinOnline to help answer all these questions and more using the databases below:

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Everything You Need to Know About Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett

Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, Fastcase, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

The recent passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg opened up a seat on the United States Supreme Court, just weeks before the presidential election. On September 26th, President Donald Trump nominated Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative federal appeals court judge, to succeed Ginsburg. If confirmed, Barrett would keep the number of women serving on the Court at three, joining Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. She would also become the youngest member of the Court. Most importantly, she would likey cement a 6-3 conservative majority. Today we will explore Barrett’s career and where she stands on major constitutional issues using HeinOnline…

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New Journals Added to HeinOnline This Month!

Content News, HeinOnline Updates, Law Journal Library, Tips and Tricks, What's New
Lauren Mattiuzzo

With the September content release, we added 11 new journals, including six new Taylor & Francis titles that are also being added to the Criminal Justice & Criminology database. Before we take a closer look at each of the new titles, we have a special announcement!

We are happy to report that due to an updated agreement with the publisher, HeinOnline now provides current content for the Columbia Law Review. The Review is one of the most widely distributed and cited law reviews in the country. It brings together a diverse group of legal scholars…

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I Dissent: The Life and Legacy of the Incomparable Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Author Profile Pages, Current Events, Exploring HeinOnline, History of Supreme Court Nominations, Law, Law Journal Library, Political Science, U.S. Supreme Court
Lauren Mattiuzzo

This past weekend, the nation lost one of its biggest social justice warriors, Ruth Bader Ginsburg. After serving on the Supreme Court of the United States for nearly three decades, Ginsburg passed away from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer at the age of 87. She was the second female justice, after Sandra Day O’Connor, to serve on the Court and was well known for her fiery dissents, her tireless fight for gender equality, and her ability to overcome adversity. Although she weighed only 100 lbs, this 5’1″ feminist icon was larger than life.

The Beginning of Greatness

Ruth Bader Ginsburg attended Cornell…

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