Tag: slavery in america and the world

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The statue commemorating the site of the Lincoln - Douglas debate in the Washington Park Historic District of Ottawa, Illinois

Secrets of the Serial Set: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

With the issue of slavery at the forefront, the Lincoln-Douglas debates were the first political debates to receive nationwide attention, becoming public attractions that drew crowds of thousands of people and shaped politics for decades to come.

image of Black family

Carter G. Woodson: The Father of Black History Month

While Black history should be learned and celebrated throughout the year, February is nationally designated as Black History Month—and this is thanks to a Black American historian named Carter G. Woodson.

photo of student in graduation cap and gown

Education & Empowerment: The History of HBCUs

Prior to the Civil War, African Americans weren’t allowed to receive an education. The Emancipation Proclamation may have freed the enslaved according to legislation, but truly, African Americans couldn’t achieve equality without education. And that’s where HBCUs came into play.

Hands typing on laptop with blue overlay

Tip of the Week: Tools in Slavery in America and the World

The Slavery in America and the World database is particularly special because of the meticulous development and organization that went into its development, opening up opportunities for unique browse and search tools. Learn how to use these tools in this guide.

People protesting for black lives matter

Researching Critical Race Theory in HeinOnline

Critical race theory is a concept that has been around for decades but became a hot topic of discussion in 2020 after the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and other African Americans by police officers. Join HeinOnline as we take a deeper dive into what Critical Race Theory is and its history.

Old woman in rocking chair

Juneteenth Day: Celebrating an End to Slavery in the United States

Today, people across the United States are commemorating the end to American slavery. Juneteenth Day—a portmanteau of “June” and “nineteenth”—is the oldest known celebration of African-American emancipation. Read along to learn the history of Juneteenth.

Judge Gavel

Celebrating the 65th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

May 2019 marks 65 years since the ruling of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark decision in which the Supreme Court determined racial segregation in schools to be unconstitutional. Continue reading to discover more about the case and check out how Brown v. Board fits into the evolution of U.S.

image of Mount Rushmore

Celebrating Presidents’ Day with Abraham Lincoln and George Washington

The American holiday of Presidents’ Day was originally established in 1885 in recognition of the first President of the United States, George Washington. It was officially called Washington’s Birthday and observed as a federal holiday on February 22nd, Washington’s actual day of birth.